Part B

Impact of biosimilar entry on drug costs

While generic drugs frequently replace their branded counterparts after the latter lose their market exclusivity, the uptake of biosimilar products is often slower. Further, biosimilars are relatively more expensive compared to generic small molecule drugs. A key question then is how much could payers save by switching to biosimilars after loss of exclusivity. The is …

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Making medicines more affordable: Modernizing Medicare

Common-sense reforms can help ensure everyone benefits from America’s engine of innovation and receives the care they need and deserve. In this series, we’re taking a closer look at PhRMA’s advocacy efforts to make medicines more affordable, part of our patient-centered agenda which aims to lower barriers between our industry’s medical innovations and patients who need them. 

ICYMI: New study confirms policies like H.R. 3 could significantly reduce drug development

A new study from economists at the University of Chicago examined the impact that government price-setting policies for medicines, like those in H.R. 3, could have if implemented. The economists found that a policy like H.R. 3 could reduce investment in the research and development (R&D) of new medicines by up to 60% between 2021 …

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Recent polling misrepresents public support for Medicare “negotiation”

Proponents of government price setting often misrepresent voters’ opinions on support for allowing the federal government to “negotiate” drug prices. This includes recent polling from advocacy firms like the Alliance for Retired Americans/Lake Research Partners that fails to reveal voters’ true health care priorities and concerns with government price setting, or so-called “negotiation.”

What they’re saying: Patient advocates want to protect Medicare from government interference

For seniors and people with disabilities, Medicare Parts B and D provide important access to lifesaving medicines. Unfortunately, some in Congress are proposing changes to Medicare under the guise of “negotiation,” meaning the government can set the price of medicines. But experts agree access to current and future medicines for Medicare beneficiaries is threatened when …

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GAO report on prescription drug advertising

Medicare beneficiaries are largely elderly individuals, many of whom suffer from a variety of health conditions. Pharmaceutical manufacturers want these patients and their physicians to be aware of new medical treatments that become available (i.e., new approvals) as well as new uses for existing drugs (i.e., new FDA indications). Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is one way …

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The ABCs (and Ds) of Medicare

For nearly 60 years, Medicare has helped pay for medical care for Americans over the age of 65, as well as younger Americans with certain medical needs. Medicare has many different programs, all named with different letters of the alphabet, so it can often feel confusing. With Medicare increasingly in the news, clarity around how …

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New analysis finds stark difference in coverage of breast cancer medicines for seniors in the United States and England

In the United States, seniors and people with disabilities enjoy broad coverage of physician-administered medicines under Medicare Part B because the program relies on market competition to balance access, innovation and cost control. But the same cannot be said for patients in other countries. In fact, a new analysis from Avalere underscores the dangers of …

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No matter how you look at it, the Most Favored Nation rule is bad policy

Last month, the administration released the “Most Favored Nation” (MFN) rule, which allows foreign governments to decide the value of Part B medicines, while also likely limiting seniors’ access to existing medicines and discouraging investments in future treatments and cures. No matter how you look at it, the MFN rule is bad policy.