Drug companies look to AI to end ‘hit and miss’ research

Technology that speeded the development of Covid vaccines has potential to transform the pharmaceutical industry

The hunt for new medicines has often been more like a game of roulette than high-end science. But now the pharmaceutical sector is on the cusp of a transformation, as it delves into cutting-edge technology to come up with new treatments for diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer’s.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is set to improve the industry’s success rates and speed up drug discovery, potentially saving it billions of dollars, a recent survey by the analytics firm GlobalData has found. AI topped a list of technologies seen as having the greatest impact on the sector this year. Almost 100 partnerships have been struck between AI specialists and large pharma companies for drug discovery since 2015.

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CBD will go on sale in Australia, but first manufacturers will have to prove it works

While CBD has been approved for over-the-counter sale, there are regulatory hurdles to clear before it actually appears in pharmacies

“You can have as much whiskey as you like, but there’s no whiskey available,” says Prof Iain McGregor, psychopharmacologist and academic director of the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics, when asked to describe the rules around CBD in Australia at the moment.

Related: How a cannabis farm cured my fear of nature | Zoe Williams

You have this runaway train that’s way beyond the evidence available

If it’s going to be treated as a medicine, it needs to go through the processes medicines go through

It usually takes years and millions of dollars to bring a drug to market

Related: Hash landing: New Zealand police ditch annual helicopter hunt for cannabis dens

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There are two new Covid-fighting drugs I haven’t heard much about – is it because they are unpronounceable? | Adrian Chiles

Generic medicine names can sound like random collections of syllables. But there is a method to it

It is a couple of weeks since the announcement of two important new drugs in the treatment of Covid. They have not really been mentioned since, especially in the broadcast media. I think I know why: their names are a right mouthful and have been made a meal of several times by people like me. The prime minister, alas, fumbled them in the first place, but on this occasion I don’t see we can blame him. Even with a bit of practice and a steady run-up, tocilizumab and sarilumab remain hard to say and next to impossible to remember.

I have long wondered where they conjure these names up. It is tricky enough, especially for older people, to get your head around what you’re taking and when and what for, without dealing with all these unmemorable, apparently random collections of syllables. I have been taking something for reflux for years and I still forget whether it’s opremazole or omeprazole.

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Zoloft enters list of 10 most commonly prescribed drugs in Australia

Increase in women being diagnosed with depression partly behind rise in use

An increase in women being diagnosed with depression is partly behind a significant rise in prescriptions of the antidepressant sertraline – sold under the brand name Zoloft – which is in the list of Australia’s most commonly prescribed drugs for the first time.

On Tuesday Australian Prescriber published its annual list of the 10 most commonly taken drugs – based on standard daily doses for every 1,000 people in the population each day – along with a list of the 10 most costly drugs to government, and the 10 most common drugs by prescription counts.

Related: Why mental health is the legacy-defining fight Scott Morrison can’t afford to lose | Katharine Murphy

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Shionogi and Nagasaki University Collaborate with the Kitasato Institute for Antimalarial Drugs

Shots:

  • Kitasato & Shionogi-Nagasaki will collaborate on the R&D of the new antimalarial natural products discovered by Ōmura Satoshi Memorial Institute for the antimalarial drugs
  • The collaboration accelerates the research for antimalarial drugs & vaccines by fostering an open innovation platform merging the strengths of diverse partners for malaria eradication
  • Additionally, Shionogi-Nagasaki also collaborate with NIID, under which NIID’s expertise & technology for malaria infection & its molecular mechanisms are merged with Shionogi-Nagasaki’s discovery research for novel antimalarial drugs & vaccines

Click here ­to­ read full press release/ article | Ref: Shionogi | Image: Shionogi

The post Shionogi and Nagasaki University Collaborate with the Kitasato Institute for Antimalarial Drugs first appeared on PharmaShots.

Purdue Pharma pleads guilty to criminal charges related to US opioid crisis

OxyContin maker admits to actions aimed at boosting opioid prescriptions, including conspiring to defraud officials and offering illegal kickbacks

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty to criminal charges over the handling of its addictive prescription painkiller OxyContin, capping a deal with federal prosecutors to resolve an investigation into the drugmaker’s role in the US opioid crisis.

During a court hearing conducted remotely on Tuesday before US district judge Madeline Cox Arleo in New Jersey, Purdue pleaded guilty to three felonies covering widespread misconduct.

Related: OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma to plead guilty to three criminal charges – report

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Anti-Covid treatments being given to Trump are still unproven, say experts

Neither remdesivir nor REGN-COV2 have completed large-scale randomised trials, say UK scientists

Scientists still lack conclusive proof that the two anti-Covid drugs given to Donald Trump are clinically effective.

UK researchers point out that both medicines – remdesivir and REGN-COV2 – have still to complete the large-scale, randomised trials needed to demonstrate fully their ability to counter Covid-19 in patients. And many have criticised US authorities for their failures to carry out such trials. This has undermined efforts to find effective medicines to treat people affected by the disease.

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The Oxford University AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine trial has been paused – should we be worried?

Is this the end for hopes of an early breakthrough in the race to find a coronavirus drug?

The halt in development of the University of Oxford’s Covid-19 vaccine due to a possible adverse reaction in a trial participant has triggered fears of a delay in finding a solution to coronavirus restrictions.

A spokesman for AstraZeneca, the company working with the academic team to produce the vaccine, said the voluntary pause is “routine”.

Related: Oxford University Covid vaccine trial put on hold due to adverse reaction in participant

Related: Why are Australian church leaders opposing the Oxford coronavirus vaccine?

Related: Covid-19: ‘possible’ Oxford vaccine data will be put before regulators this year

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Exclusive interview with ForwardVue Pharma released for Ophthalmic Drugs 2020

SMi reports: Alan Franklin, CEO, ForwardVue Pharma will be presenting at the Ophthalmic Drugs conference The 4th Annual Ophthalmic Drugs Conference taking place on the 23rd -24th November 2020, will explore new discoveries in the treatment of ocular disease, innovations in combination technologies, and the utterly unique challenges that are faced in the treatment of one of the most complex organs in the body.

In the run up to the conference, Alan Franklin, CEO, ForwardVue Pharma is interviewed by SMi Group to discuss his presentation details, insights of the Ophthalmic market and his thoughts on the biggest growth area and key developments that have taken place in the last year.

Those who register by the 30th September will save £100 with the early bird discount: http://www.ophthalmicdrugs.com/pharmapr4

Snapshot of Alan’s interview:

The ophthalmic drugs industry is maturing each year, in your opinion, what are the key developments that have taken place in the last year?

“The key news to me is the lack of development of approved and late stage anti-angiogenic molecules. Brolucizumab was approved, but it is associated with a small risk of occlusive vasculitis which can lead to profound, irreversible vision loss. Therefore, brolucizumab has not been widely adopted. The NDA for Abicipar pegol, which utilizes DARPin technology was rejected by the FDA secondary to concerns of inflammation with the 2 mg dose”.

What current topic will you be addressing in your presentation, and what would you say makes it relevant to 2020?

“We believe that stable small molecule therapy will offer both efficacy and durability advantages to the current treatment paradigm for common retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, DR, and neovascular age related macular degeneration, nAMD”.

The brochure with the full interview, agenda and speaker line up is available online at:

http://www.ophthalmicdrugs.com/pharmapr4

 

Ophthalmic Drugs Conference

23rd -24th November 2020

#OphthalmicDrugs

Proudly sponsored by Experimentica

For exclusive tailored sponsorship packages contact: Alia Malick on +44 (0)20 7827 6168 or email [email protected]

For media queries please contact Jinna Sidhu [email protected] or call +44 (0)20 7827 6088.

—End—

About SMi Group:

Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward-thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk

The post Exclusive interview with ForwardVue Pharma released for Ophthalmic Drugs 2020 appeared first on .

UK warns drug firms to stockpile in case of Brexit disruption

Companies should ensure six weeks’ worth of drugs for end of transition period, DHSC says

Pharmaceutical companies should stockpile six weeks’ worth of drugs to guard against disruption at the end of the Brexit transition period, the government has said.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has written to medicine suppliers advising them to make boosting their reserves a priority.

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Will the Drug Repurposing Industry Boom due to the Pandemic?

Since, the outbreak of novel coronavirus, drug repurposing has become one of the core research strategies for finding a treatment. Several clinical studies for the already approved drugs, have been registered in order to identify cure for the novel coronavirus infection. It is known that on an average, it takes around 12 to 15 years to develop and commercialize a novel drug product, involving high financial investments. On the other hand, drug repurposing has become an integral part of the pharma and the healthcare sector globally. This is due to the fact that drug repurposing offers costs and time related benefits in early stages of development. Presently, drug repurposing is one of the viable options for the pharma industry to win against the pandemic. This pandemic has led increased interest in this domain.

What is the role of drug repurposing service providers?

Many start-ups, mid-sized and well-established players are primarily focusing on collaborating together so as to minimize the workload on the big firms for the development and the commercialization of a drug in lesser time. Several number of service providers, including contract research organizations (CROs), claim to provide the necessary support to drug developers in identifying / predicting prospective drug candidates for repurposing. Such companies offer a variety of services, encompassing both drug discovery operations and consultancy requirements. In fact, many of such players claim to have developed proprietary platforms based on advanced technologies, such as big data analysis, artificial intelligence (AI) and real-world evidence, in order to facilitate drug repurposing related decision-making.

Will the Drug Repurposing Industry Boom due to the Pandemic?

Since 2011, the drug repurposing domain has become an attractive alternative to the slow pace traditional drug discovery and development process. There are few notable examples that could quote the success of this methodology such as Pfizer’s Sildenafil and Grunenthal’s Thalidomide. Sildenafil was originally developed to treat coronary artery disease in 1980. But in the year 1998, it became a blockbuster due to its new use in treating erectile dysfunction.

What are the recent initiatives undertaken in the field of drug repurposing, to combat COVID-19?

In the past few months, several drug repurposing service providers have undertaken various collaborative initiatives, to develop vaccines / biologics as the potential therapeutic against COVID-19. For instance, in April 2020, SOM Biotech partnered with Ewha Womans University to identify targets against coronavirus by using SOM Biotech’s technology. Some of the prominent examples of approved drugs that are being evaluated to treat COVID- include chloroquine / hydroxychloroquine (anti-malarial drug) and remdesivir (initially developed to treat hepatitis C). Due to the rapid advances in the field of biology, genomics and bioinformatics, drug repurposing strategy has been actively engaged in finding ways for combating rare diseases in recent years. It is expected that the process of identifying new uses for existing drugs will continue to gain popularity in the near future as well. Thus, greatly helping the progress of the medical and the healthcare sector

Visit this link for more Insights.

Roots Analysis – Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology and Medical Devices.

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The post Will the Drug Repurposing Industry Boom due to the Pandemic? appeared first on Blog.

Novel Platforms in Ocular Drug Delivery workshop discussed at Ophthalmic Drugs

SMi reports: Dr. Thakur Raghu Raj Singh from Queen’s University Belfast will lead the post conference workshop on Wednesday 25th November 2020.

SMi presents the 4th Annual Ophthalmic Drugs Conference taking place on the 23rd -24th November 2020, in London. SMi are also pleased to announce that they will be hosting a half-day post-conference workshop, Wednesday 25th November 2020 at 08.30 – 12.30.

Those who register by the 30th September will save £100 with the early bird discount: http://www.ophthalmicdrugs.com/pharmapr2

Workshop will be on ‘Novel Platforms in Ocular Drug Delivery’. Hosted by Dr. Thakur Raghu Raj Singh, Reader in Pharmaceutics, Queen’s University Belfast.

In this workshop, challenges associated with different delivery systems and routes of administration will be explored. The benefits and challenges in the design of long-acting (LA) drug delivery systems will be analysed. In this session there will be a use tangible examples of both ocular and non-ocular LA technologies that have been successfully launched in the market. Finally, it will focus on the design space of LA technologies for small molecules vs biologics and the applicability of devices in the delivery of LA formulations.

By attending delegates will learn current unmet medical needs in the treatment of ocular diseases. They will be able to discuss current LA products on the market by analysing both ocular and non-ocular technologies. Also discuss challenges in the design of a LA ocular drug delivery technology for small vs large molecules. Attendees will be able to learn the role of devices in the delivery of LA drug delivery systems and review novel LA technologies under development.

About the workshop leader

Dr Raj Thakur is a Reader in Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy (SoP), QUB and is the Founder, CTO and Director of Re-Vana Therapeutics. His research interest is in the design and physicochemical characterisation of advanced long-acting biodegradable drug delivery systems including minimally invasive medical devices for localised drug delivery. He is the Chair for Ocular Drug Delivery (OcDD) Focus Group supported by the mission of Controlled Release Society (CRS). He has authored over 160 scientific publications, including 60 full papers, 10 book chapters, five textbooks, several invited talks in national and international conferences and patents.

Interested parties can learn more about the workshop and full agenda by visiting: http://www.ophthalmicdrugs.com/pharmapr2

Ophthalmic Drugs Conference

23rd -24th November 2020

#OphthalmicDrugs

For exclusive tailored sponsorship packages contact: Alia Malick on +44 (0)20 7827 6168 or email [email protected]

For media queries please contact Jinna Sidhu [email protected] or call +44 (0)20 7827 6088.

—End—

About SMi Group:

Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward-thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk

The post Novel Platforms in Ocular Drug Delivery workshop discussed at Ophthalmic Drugs appeared first on .

Increasing Rate of Drug Failure has Prompted the Drug Developers to Rely on CROs offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services for their Outsourcing Requirements

It is important to note that the process of drug discovery is extremely demanding, both in terms of capital and time. In fact, the overall amount spent on R&D initiatives in the pharmaceutical / biotechnology sector has increased from around USD 128 billion in 2008 to USD 165 billion in 2018. Moreover, only a small fraction of early stage therapeutic candidates are able to make it past preclinical evaluation. According to a study conducted on terminated drug development programs, the high rate drug failure in clinical trials was primarily attributed to problems associated with their pharmacokinetic profiles, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties and inherent toxicity.

With increasing cases of drug failure, due to problems associated with pharmacokinetic profiles of candidate therapies, ADME properties and inherent toxicity, industry players are actively looking for more advanced solutions. Drug developers prefer to opt for contract service providers that offer a range of capabilities, such as design, synthesis, initial scale-up, in vitro ADME testing, safety pharmacology, under one roof; this guarantees a certain degree of ease of operation, and enables sponsors to shortlist and rely on a capable partner for their outsourcing requirements.

Increasing Rate of Drug Failure has Prompted the Drug Developers to Rely on CROs offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services for their Outsourcing Requirements

Service Providers Offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services

Over 95 CROs, featuring a mix of small-sized (less than 50 employees, 42%), mid-sized (50-200 employees, 17%), large companies (200-1,000 employees, 15%) and very large companies (more than 1,000 employees, 26%), offer contract services for in vitro ADME testing.

Increasing Rate of Drug Failure has Prompted the Drug Developers to Rely on CROs offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services for their Outsourcing Requirements

To know about the companies that claim to offer in vitro ADME testing services, check out our report here

What is the Regional Distribution of Service Providers?

Majority of the CROs (nearly 80%) are based in North America and Europe. Within North America, the US has the maximum number of players, whereas, in Europe, most of the service providers are distributed across France, Germany, the UK, and Spain. A relatively smaller, but growing, proportion of such players are situated in the Asia-Pacific region; India, China, and Australia have a significant number of firms that claim to offer ADME testing services.

Increasing Rate of Drug Failure has Prompted the Drug Developers to Rely on CROs offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services for their Outsourcing Requirements

Which Company Has an Edge Over Other Companies?

With so many players in the market, it may become baffling to decide on which company would serve your purpose. Some companies do have advantages over other competitors, in terms of their experience, and service portfolio. With the intention to develop a better understanding of the overall potential and capabilities of industry players involved in this domain, we carried out a benchmarking analysis of the various stakeholders across different geographies.

Increasing Rate of Drug Failure has Prompted the Drug Developers to Rely on CROs offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services for their Outsourcing Requirements

Recent Advances

Recently, in February 2020, Eurofins Discovery and PharmaResources, a leading CRO based in China, announced a commercial cooperation agreement to provide PharmaResources’ customers with expedited access to Eurofins Discovery’s pharmacology and ADMET portfolio to accelerate their client’s drug discovery timelines. Earlier in July 2019, SEKISUI XenoTech announced collaboration with the Drug Development Solutions Center to offer a full suite of ADME testing services. In May 2020, SEKISUI XenoTech received a US patent for an in vitro method to evaluate xenobiotics as immune-modulators of drug transport and metabolism For More Insights check out the report here

In Vitro ADME Testing Services Market, 2019-2030

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The post Increasing Rate of Drug Failure has Prompted the Drug Developers to Rely on CROs offering In Vitro ADME Testing Services for their Outsourcing Requirements appeared first on Blog.

Australian drugmakers hit by critical shortages at height of pandemic, inquiry hears

Evidence given to parliamentary committee sparks new calls to develop national capability to manufacture medicines and key supplies

Australian companies were “shocked” to experience price-gouging and had trouble accessing critical supplies to make medicines and personal protective equipment at the height of the pandemic, a parliamentary committee has been told.

It has prompted fresh calls for Australia to build up its ability to manufacture critical drugs “without reliance on opaque and fragile offshore supply chains”.

Related: Paracetamol and Ventolin limited to one per customer as Australia combats coronavirus hoarding

Related: Australia needs a national centre for disease control, peak doctors’ group says

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