Workforce

Workforce absences during the pandemic, by race and gender

During the pandemic, U.S. workers reported a 50 percent increase in work absences due to personal illness, child care needs or family obligations compared to previous years, according to a new report released Aug. 1 by the Urban Institute with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

AHA: Healthcare workers need to be protected like flight crews

While hospitals have made efforts to reduce violence against their staff, such as raising risk awareness and security investments, healthcare workers deserve stronger protections at the federal level, similar to flight screws, American Hospital Association leaders said in an op-ed published Aug. 2 in The Hill.

New Florida council aimed at solving nursing shortage

Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Keiser University and the National Association of Hispanic Nurses have joined ranks to create an advisory council that aims to solve Southern Florida’s nursing shortage, which is predicted to worsen by 2035, Miami Today News reported July 19. 

One tactic to reduce burnout and resignation? No meetings among senior staff

This April, MultiCare Health System rolled out an initiative called Spring Connection Week, a week in which meetings were cleared from the schedules of supervisors, managers and directors so that they could conduct one-on-one rounds with their frontline staff. Stacey Parkin, MultiCare’s chief patient experience officer, thinks other hospitals should steal the idea as a …

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Nurses blame SLU Hospital management for staffing woes

Several nurses at St. Louis University Hospital protested June 3 to raise awareness about working conditions at the hospital, St. Louis on the Air reported on July 14. Nurses said their departments are regularly understaffed and that hospital management has not done enough to address their concerns. They also want management to put more effort into …

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June was a good month for healthcare hiring, but the staffing crisis can only be solved by tech, VBC

Healthcare employment levels are still significantly below what they need to be, and they aren’t on track to get there any time soon. Experts are saying the increased deployment of technology, such as remote patient monitoring and robotic process automation, as well as value-based care models, will be the only sustainable solution to get providers …

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Which parts of England are losing GP partners fastest?

More than 2,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) GP partners have been lost to general practice in the past three years alone – but parts of the country have fared far worse. GPonline looks at which parts of England are losing partners fastest.

OSF Ventures’ new leader will focus investments on alternative care modalities, workforce retention

OSF Ventures — the investment arm of Peoria, Illinois-based OSF HealthCare — gained a new leader last week when Mayank Taneja took the helm. In the role, Taneja oversees $250 million in assets across three funds. The venture capital arm is currently focused on investing in solutions to take care outside the four walls of …

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Report: Physician turnover rates are climbing as they clamor for better work-life balance

Job turnover is on the rise among physicians because their desire for flexibility and work-life balance is emboldening them to leave jobs where they feel overworked or underappreciated, according to a new report. It found that 43% of physicians switched jobs during the pandemic, 8% retired, and 3% left medicine to work in a non-clinical …

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Is nursing recession-proof?

Amid a growing risk of recession for the U.S., there is at least one healthcare occupation that appears in solid position to withstand an economic downturn: nursing, a registered nurse from Louisiana argues in a June 20 article on nurse.org.  

Lawmakers move to combat violence against healthcare workers

Violence against healthcare workers is a subject that has been highlighted by healthcare organizations nationwide during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the wake of recent shootings on hospital campuses, including on the campus of Saint Francis Health System in Tulsa, Okla., there is even more urgency to address the issue. 

Where hospitals are offering internal travel programs

Many hospitals and health systems turned to third-party staffing agencies during the COVID-19 pandemic to address shortages of clinicians and other healthcare professionals. Now a growing number of organizations are offering internal travel programs amid an opportunity to attract workers while decreasing contract labor expenses.

Workers age 55+ are returning to work

Millions of older Americans have returned to work in recent months, with nearly 64 percent of adults between ages 55 and 64 working in April essentially matching the share working in February 2020 and marking a more complete recovery than most younger age groups, according to a May 19 The New York Times report. 

Michigan grants full practice authority for CRNAs

Michigan is the 20th state to allow certified registered nurse anesthetists to practice without physician supervision after Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed a bill into law granting full practice authority for those providers, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology.

Viewpoint: The case for labor peace agreements

The federal government should step in to help stabilize turbulent healthcare workforce issues by enforcing labor peace agreements between health systems and unions, Gabriel Winant, PhD, and Theresa Brown, PhD, BSN, RN, argue in a May 9 New York Times op-ed.

When new hires go dark

Increasingly, organizations are being ghosted by new hires as the freshly recruited employees never show up for work, reported The Wall Street Journal May 5. 

Healthcare adds 34K jobs in April

The U.S. labor landscape improved as it gained jobs and unemployment remained unchanged. The healthcare sector in particular added thousands of new roles, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics April 2022 report. 

The globally declining birth rate and the role of egg freezing

Depopulation places an unsustainable burden on a diminishing workforce, as fewer workers are available to support an increasing number of seniors. But technological improvements in egg freezing have resulted in vastly improved pregnancy rates and could help slow the decline in births.

3 health systems making a bet on internal travel programs

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. hospitals and health systems have been tasked with addressing exacerbated clinician shortages. Many organizations turned to third-party staffing agencies and travelers to fill workforce gaps. Now some health systems are addressing their need for skilled clinicians through internal travel programs. 

3 health systems making a bet on internal travel programs

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. hospitals and health systems have been tasked with addressing exacerbated clinician shortages. Many organizations turned to third-party staffing agencies and travelers to fill workforce gaps. Now some health systems are addressing their need for skilled clinicians through internal travel programs. 

2 states, 2 health system approaches to nurse recruitment

As hospitals and health systems vie for nursing talent, many organizations have turned to compensation as well as perks beyond pay. The question of whether these rising labor expenses are sustainable appears to be multifaceted and dependent on an organization’s vantage point. But in the most populated state in the U.S. — and in one …

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The age group slowest to return to the workforce

The pandemic resulted in fewer Americans actively seeking employment or being employed across all age groups, but those ages 55-64 appear to be among the slowest to return to the workforce, according to research released March 24 by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, a private, nonpartisan and nonprofit research institute.

Job openings at top hospitals and health systems, by the numbers

As the U.S. enters the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals and health systems continue to grapple with staffing challenges caused by factors such as workers leaving their jobs and housing costs. Below are the number of job openings at the hospitals and health systems that were among the top 20 spots in U.S. News …

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The influence of ‘zillennials’ in the workplace

Employers seeking to satisfy “zillennials,” a micro-generation born between 1993 and 1998, have an array of factors to consider as members of this group rethink their workplace experiences and what they want out of their jobs, according to MetLife’s annual U.S. Employee Benefit Trends Study.

NYC Health + Hospitals plans 874 layoffs when universal contact tracing ends

NYC Test & Trace Corps, the city’s initiative for COVID-19 testing and contact tracing, is ending universal contact tracing by the end of April. NYC Health + Hospitals, which leads the program in collaboration with the city’s department of health and other agencies, is planning to lay off 874 workers when the program scales back, …

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Non-competes, occupational licensing in feds’ crosshairs

Lack of competition causes wage declines of roughly 20 percent for workers compared to what they’d otherwise earn in an environment with healthier competition among employers, according to a new report from the Treasury Department that signals federal focus on barriers to labor-market competition.

This state has the most physicians per capita

Washington, D.C., has the highest number of active physicians per 100,000 residents, according to the latest Association of American Medical Colleges State Physician Workforce Data Report. The state with the most active physicians per resident is Massachusetts, while Idaho is the state with the least.