#Healthin2Point00, Episode 187 | Redox, Nanit, Innovacer & MindMed

Today on Health in 2 Point 00, Jess makes me pronounce some impossible words while we cover lots of funding deals. Redox has raised $45 million in a Series D, bringing their total up to $95 million. Nanit, another baby monitoring company, raises $25 million in a Series C, Innovaccer raises a $105 million D round, and psychedelic biotech company MindMed acquires digital health company HealthMode. —Matthew Holt

Withings, Redox Partner to Make Remote Patient Monitoring Devices Integrated With All EHRs

Withings, Redox Partner to Make Remote Patient Monitoring Devices Integrated With All EHRs

What You Should Know:

– Withings partners with healthcare IT integration
company Redox, which will make its remote patient monitoring solution, Withings
MED·PRO CARE, compatible with nearly all EHRs used by physicians, hospitals,
and medical institutions.

– Through the partnership, physicians can now order and
ship Withings clinically-validated connected health devices directly to their
patients through their EHR.

– As patients use their Withings devices, which are
designed to be simple to use daily, their physicians can access and analyze
their patients’ data seamlessly through Redox.


Withings, early
pioneers of the connected health revolution, today announced it has partnered
with Redox, a single, secure API
endpoint that connects and integrates provider EHRs with healthcare
products and services. The partnership makes MED·PRO CARE, the
unique Withings remote patient monitoring solution, compatible with nearly all
EHRs used by physicians, hospitals, and medical institutions.

Withings MED·PRO CARE

Withings launched MED·PRO CARE, its remote patient
monitoring platform, to allow caregivers, medical institutions, and private
organizations to manage multiple patients’ physiological data through the
company’s portfolio of connected health devices and data analytical
capabilities.

Patients benefit from beautifully designed devices that
require little to no set up to fit effortlessly into their daily lives. In
fact, thanks to the Withings Data HUB, a plug and play cellular gateway created
specifically for Withings MED·PRO solutions, health providers can even deliver
devices to patients that require no set up or daily management at all.

Clinically Validated Health Devices Now Compatible with
EHRs

Through the partnership, physicians can now order and ship
Withings clinically-validated connected health devices directly to their
patients through their EHR in just a few simple steps. Patients can use their
Withings devices to monitor and track their health in their traditional home
environments while their physicians access and analyze their data seamlessly
through Redox. The solution is HIPAA compliant and uses HL7 international
standards.

“During the pandemic, the importance of remote patient monitoring soared. However, for its long term success and utilization to be assured, it must be simple for both physicians and their patients,” said Mathieu Letombe, CEO of Withings. “Our partnership with Redox means Withings now integrates into practically every EHR system allowing physicians and hospitals to easily send Withings devices to their patients and access insights into their daily blood pressure, weight, sleep patterns, heart rates, and more. With Redox’s one connection and our range of devices, designed to easily integrate into patients’ everyday lives, the entire process is effortless for all involved, and many of the common frictions associated with remote patient monitoring are removed.”

Availability

Withings connected health devices are now available through
Redox.

Redox Adds Data on Demand, Single Sign-On Access to Interoperability Platform

Redox Launches Rapid Deployment Telehealth Model for Providers to Go-Live in Less Than 2 Weeks

What You Should Know:

– Redox adds data on demand and single sign-on access
features to its cloud interoperability platform to help to simplify the process
of developing software for healthcare.

– Both new features are now available to all customers on
the Redox platform.

Redox
Inc.
, a Madison, WI-based interoperability platform for healthcare data
exchange, unveiled Data on Demand, which enables software developers to query
any electronic health
record (EHR)
or healthcare data source via the Redox API. Powered by a
FHIR-conformant data storage architecture, Data on Demand is pre-built
integration infrastructure designed to simplify and normalize the integration
experience and reduce the technical burden of consuming hundreds or thousands
of messages per day. In addition, the company has added Single Sign-on that allows applications using Redox to make
it easier for providers to launch their products from within their EHR in an
efficient manner. Both features are available to all customers on the Redox
platform. 

Data on Demand and Single Sign-on Simplify the Process of
Developing Software

Redox continues to expand the integration capabilities
healthcare software developers can access through a single API with these new
features:

Data on Demand converts traditional HL7 feeds into a
data store that application developers can query on demand. This provides a
consistent integration experience that works with both the push- and API-based
integrations provided by EHR companies. Regardless of how data is provided by
the EHR, Redox customers can more easily manage the volume of messages and
logic needed to update information, allowing them to focus on getting the data
that they want, when they want it. No other integration vendor can turn HL7
feeds into reusable queries.

Single Sign-On (SSO) allows customers to improve the
provider’s experience with their products by sharing login credentials and
pertinent patient or visit context along with patient data that they’ve
collected. This allows applications on the Redox network to securely connect to
other applications and share the login context for a user. Customers trust Redox
to verify that the SSO request is valid, and Redox normalizes and pulls the
information to launch the application.

“Redox continues to develop the robust integration
capabilities software developers need to navigate the fragmented world of data
exchange and interoperability in healthcare,” said Niko Skievaski, co-founder
and president, Redox. “The Redox API is transforming the way healthcare
organizations access and share data. Our company’s ultimate goal is to enable
the frictionless adoption of technology in healthcare, and we’re making great
strides as the interoperability standard and one-stop-shop for our customers.” 

Open APIs in Healthcare: The Future of Data Integration Report

Open APIs in Healthcare: The Future of Data Integration Report

What You Should Know:

– The latest Chilmark Research report examines how data-oriented APIs are contributing to development and integration efforts across healthcare from the perspective of the developer.

– Reeling from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and
seeking more effective ways to implement new functionality, healthcare
enterprises of all kinds are looking to alternatives for prevailing development
and integration practices.


Unlocking value
from the data scattered across healthcare communities was once a tantalizing
opportunity. After COVID-19,
it is an existential necessity. Chilmark
Research’s
latest Market Trends Report, Open APIs in Healthcare: The Future of Data Integration, captures a market whose approach to data access and
integration will be changing substantially in the coming years and introduces a
subvertical within healthcare
IT
that anticipates a 16% CAGR through 2025.

APIs Are Still New in Healthcare

What You Should Know:  - Latest Chilmark Research report, examines how data-oriented APIs are contributing to development and integration efforts across healthcare from the perspective of the developer. - Reeling from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and seeking more effective ways to implement new functionality, healthcare enterprises of all kinds are looking to alternatives for prevailing development and integration practices.  Unlocking value from the data scattered across healthcare communities was once a tantalizing opportunity. After COVID-19, it is an existential necessity. Chilmark Research’s latest Market Trends Report, Open APIs in Healthcare: The Future of Data Integration, captures a market whose approach to data access and integration will be changing substantially in the coming years and introduces a subvertical within healthcare IT that anticipates a 16% CAGR through 2025.   APIs Are Still New in Healthcare  Outside healthcare, the ascendance of data access and integration facilitated by application programming interfaces (APIs) is the culmination of decades of technology evolution and implementation lessons with distributed applications. Across the SaaS landscape in particular, APIs have become the preferred method for accessing data and conducting transactions across applications and organizations. Developers recognize and appreciate the value of loosely coupling their applications and data, wherever each is located. Inside healthcare, many enterprises are hesitant on the topic of APIs, seeing them as too big a leap from established, successful software practices. But they also recognize that eliminating the need for hard-coded interfaces that must be re-implemented every time an application or its underlying data changes will deliver higher programmer productivity and more-responsive applications.   Traditional Integration Methods Fall Short Conventional development and integration approaches proved cumbersome and slow in efforts to contribute to understanding or responding to the current health crisis. Unlocking more value from the data scattered across healthcare communities is — post-COVID-19 — a critical element in clinical and financial renewal. “Enterprises across healthcare were already wrestling with challenging market forces and government mandates,” says Brian Murphy, the report’s lead author and analyst. “Open APIs will play a central role for providers, payers, or any healthcare enterprises that intend to better utilize their data and pursue development efforts that make them — and the broader healthcare community — more responsive and adaptable to the demands of a post-pandemic healthcare system.” Developers Require Accessible Data Developers find data wherever they can from among a large and confusing mix of data holders and associated vendors. This report identifies the sources where different kinds of health-related data are most likely to be API-accessible. It shows how APIs are already contributing to development and integration efforts across healthcare and estimates the much larger potential of widespread adoption. This report includes detailed profiles on 20 public and private organizations and their offerings, including 1upHealth, 4Medica, Allscripts, Apple, Athenahealth, Availity, Blue Button 2.0, Cerner, Change Healthcare, Datica, Epic, Human API, Meditech, NextGen, NCPDP, Particle Health, The Sequoia Project, Redox, Surescripts, and Validic. For more information about the report, visit https://www.chilmarkresearch.com/chilmark_report/open-apis-in-healthcare-the-future-of-data-integration/

Outside healthcare, the ascendance of
data access and integration facilitated by application programming interfaces
(APIs) is the culmination of decades of technology evolution and implementation
lessons with distributed applications. Across the SaaS landscape in particular,
APIs have become the preferred method for accessing data and conducting
transactions across applications and organizations. Developers recognize and
appreciate the value of loosely coupling their applications and data, wherever
each is located.

Inside healthcare, many enterprises are
hesitant on the topic of APIs, seeing them as too big a leap from established,
successful software practices. But they also recognize that eliminating the
need for hard-coded interfaces that must be re-implemented every time an
application or its underlying data changes will deliver higher programmer
productivity and more-responsive applications.

Traditional Integration Methods Fall
Short

Conventional development and
integration approaches proved cumbersome and slow in efforts to contribute to
understanding or responding to the current health crisis. Unlocking more value
from the data scattered across healthcare communities is — post-COVID-19 —
a critical element in clinical and
financial renewal.

“Enterprises across healthcare were already wrestling with challenging market forces and government mandates,” says Brian Murphy, the report’s lead author and analyst. “Open APIs will play a central role for providers, payers, or any healthcare enterprises that intend to better utilize their data and pursue development efforts that make them — and the broader healthcare community — more responsive and adaptable to the demands of a post-pandemic healthcare system.”

Developers Require Accessible Data

Open APIs in Healthcare: The Future of Data Integration Report

Developers find data wherever they can from among a large
and confusing mix of data holders and associated vendors. This report
identifies the sources where different kinds of health-related data are most
likely to be API-accessible. It shows how APIs are already contributing to
development and integration efforts across healthcare and estimates the much
larger potential of widespread adoption.

This report includes detailed profiles on 20 public and
private organizations and their offerings, including 1upHealth, 4Medica,
Allscripts, Apple, Athenahealth, Availity, Blue Button 2.0, Cerner, Change
Healthcare, Datica, Epic, Human API, Meditech, NextGen, NCPDP, Particle Health,
The Sequoia Project, Redox, Surescripts, and Validic.

For more information about the
report, visit https://www.chilmarkresearch.com/chilmark_report/open-apis-in-healthcare-the-future-of-data-integration/