informed consent

Learn More Than 97% of Doctors About Lead-Time Bias

After reading this, you’ll know more than an estimated 97 percent of doctors about a critical concept called lead-time bias.  While running for president of the United States, former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani ran a campaign ad contrasting his 82 percent chance of surviving prostate cancer in the United States with the 44 percent …

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Overtreatment of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

Nine out of ten women don’t realize that some breast cancers would never have caused any problems or even become known in one’s lifetime. This is an issue ductal carcinoma in situ has brought to the forefront. The whole point of cancer screening is to “detect life-threatening disease at an earlier, more curable stage. Effective …

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Do Mammograms Have to Be Painful?

Excessive breast compression during mammography may not improve image quality and can cause unnecessary pain.  False-positive results have been described as “the most frequent harm” associated with mammogram screening, but it actually may be the pain. “There is a wide variation both in the reported frequency of pain and in degree of pain felt by …

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Most Women May Experience at Least One False-Positive Mammogram

Odds are most women will get at least one false-positive mammogram, but, thankfully, most women who are called back for further testing of a suspicious mammogram finding do not end up having cancer after all.  In response to the Swiss Medical Board’s recommendation against women of any age getting routine mammograms, critics suggested that instead …

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How Is It Possible That Mammograms Don’t Actually Save Lives?

For every life saved by mammography, as many as two to ten women are overdiagnosed and unnecessarily turned into breast cancer patients with all of the attendant harms of chemo, radiation, or surgery, without the benefits. What was the impact of the 2009 shift in recommendations by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) to …

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Why Doctors Should Not Encourage Breast Self-Exams

Various health organizations offer clashing mammogram recommendations that range from annual mammograms starting at age 40 to eliminating routine mammograms altogether. Who can you trust? Clashing mammogram recommendations ranging from annual mammograms starting at age 40 to eliminating routine mammograms altogether are offered by various health organizations. It’s hard to know who to trust given …

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Why Are Mammogram Guidelines Conflicting? 

When women are fully informed about the risks and benefits of mammograms, 70 percent may choose not to get screened. You may be in that 30 percent who opts to get a mammogram and absolutely have the right to decide for yourself.  “For nearly a century, public health organizations, professional associations, patient advocacy groups, academics, and clinicians largely viewed cancer screening as a simple, …

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90% of Women Appear Misinformed About Mammograms 

Most women are just being told what to do, rather than being given the facts needed to make a fully informed decision.   “Selling cancer screening can be easy,” begins an editorial in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. “Induce fear by exaggerating risk. Offer hope by exaggerating the benefit of screening. And don’t mention harms [caused by the screening]. It is especially easy …

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How eConsent empowers more participant engagement in clinical trials

Creating the simplest process for informed consent benefits the potential participant by allowing them the time and resources to understand fully what they are consenting to. Through eConsent processes, research also opens the door to a more diverse population to engage in trials.