Health Workforce

KFF/Post Survey Reveals the Serious Mental Health Challenges Facing Frontline Health Care Workers a Year into the COVID-19 Pandemic

About 1 in 6 Tested Positive for COVID-19, though Few Experienced Major Symptoms; Those Working in Nursing Homes or Assisted Living Facilities Most Likely to Report Testing Positive More than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, a majority of frontline health care workers say the crisis is taking a toll on their mental health, including…More

KFF/The Washington Post Frontline Health Care Workers Survey

This partnership survey with The Washington Post examines the experiences and attitudes of frontline health care workers during the coronavirus pandemic. The spread of COVID-19 throughout the country overwhelmed many health care settings with intensive care units at capacity and other facilities struggling to keep both patients and employees safe. With three COVID-19 vaccines currently …

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Analysis of Federal Bills to Strengthen Maternal Health Care

The bills in this table address a number of related maternity care issues, including extending Medicaid postpartum coverage from 60 days to one year, funding for clinical training on health equity and implicit bias, developing broader networks of maternity care providers in rural areas, and research on the potential benefits of Medicaid coverage for doula …

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New National and State Estimates for Recommended COVID-19 Vaccination Priority Population

This month the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) adopted a recommendation that health care workers and long-term care residents should be the first to receive the COVID-19 vaccine once it is authorized or approved by the FDA. A new KFF analysis estimates there are 15.5 million people working in health care settings who…More

The Critical Care Workforce and COVID-19: A State-by-State Analysis

This data note quantifies the availability of providers capable of providing critical care in each state relative to state-level population. It finds that the number of intensivist physicians is substantially smaller than that of “second-line” providers that sometimes provide critical care, such as hospitalists, pulmonologists, and anesthesiologists, lending credence to longstanding concerns that intensivists are …

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