Employers

Most Parents Don’t Want Their Schools to Require COVID-19 Vaccination, But Most Favor Requiring Masks for Unvaccinated Children and Staff

Worries about Long-Term and Serious Side Effects are Parents’ Top Concern; Hispanic and Black Parents Are More Likely than White Parents to Cite Access and Cost Issues As schools around the country prepare to reopen, a majority of parents of school-age children say they do not want their children’s schools to require students to get…More

KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor: Parents and the Pandemic

This report examines attitudes and views of parents as children head back to school amidst the rise in COVID-19 cases due to the delta variant. Nearly half of parents of children ages 12-17, who are currently eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, say their child has already been vaccinated or will get the vaccine right …

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KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor – July 2021

This report finds the share of adults who have either received a COVID-19 vaccine (67%) or say they will get vaccinated as soon as they can (3%) is little unchanged from June. A quarter of unvaccinated adults say they likely will get a vaccine by the end of they year, Unvaccinated adults are much less …

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How Employer Actions Could Facilitate Equity in COVID-19 Vaccinations

Providing paid time off to employees to get and recover from any side effects could help boost vaccination rates. Overall, nearly three in ten (28%) employed adults who not yet ready to get the vaccine say that they would be more likely to get the COVID-19 vaccine if their employer gave them paid time off …

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Survey: Large employers want more government action to curb healthcare costs

Executives at large companies feel that the cost of providing employee health benefits will become unsustainable within the next decade, a new survey shows. They want the government to play a bigger role in providing coverage and lowering costs.

Vast Majority of Large Employers Surveyed Say Broader Government Role Will Be Necessary to Control Health Costs and Provide Coverage, Survey Finds

Top executives at nearly 90% of large employers surveyed believe the cost of providing health benefits to employees will become unsustainable in the next five-to-10 years, and 85% expect the government will be required to intervene to provide coverage and contain costs, according to a new survey released today from Purchaser Business Group on Health…More

Lowering the Age of Medicare Eligibility Would Likely Reduce Health Spending for Employers, But Raise Costs for the Federal Government by Covering More People in Medicare

Two new KFF analyses find that lowering the age of Medicare eligibility from 65 to 60 could significantly reduce health spending for employers, who could potentially pass savings to employees in the form of lower premiums or higher wages. Additionally, per person health spending for older adults who move from employer coverage on to Medicare…More

Health Spending for 60-64 Year Olds Would Be Lower Under Medicare Than Under Large Employer Plans

During the presidential campaign, President Biden proposed to lower the age of Medicare eligibility from 65 to 60. This analysis uses claims data for covered medical services from both large employer plans and traditional Medicare to illustrate the potential spending effects of using Medicare payment rates in lieu of higher rates paid by employer plans …

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Essential Workers Employed Outside Health Care are Less Enthusiastic about Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine than Other Adults

There has been little research on how essential workers not employed in the health care sector have been impacted by the pandemic and their views on and experiences with COVID-19 vaccines. The latest KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor report finds that this group of workers – roughly 3 in 10 of all adults who have been…More

April 29 Web Briefing: How Large Employers View Rising Health Care Costs and the Role of Government

The COVID-19 pandemic and recent elections are changing the national conversation around expanding health care coverage and reining in rising health care costs. President Biden campaigned on a platform of expanding access to public health coverage in ways that could change the role of employer-sponsored health insurance, which currently covers about half of all Americans.…More

Analysis Estimates 5.1 Million People Fall into the Affordable Care Act’s “Family Glitch”

A new KFF analysis estimates 5.1 million people nationally fall into the Affordable Care Act’s “family glitch” that occurs when a worker receives an offer of affordable employer coverage for themselves but not for their dependents, making them ineligible for financial assistance for marketplace coverage. The so-called glitch occurs because the ACA prohibits people with…More

The ACA Family Glitch and Affordability of Employer Coverage

This analysis estimates that 5.1 million people fall into the Affordable Care Act’s “family glitch,” which occurs when a worker receives an offer of affordable employer coverage for themselves but not for their dependents, making them ineligible for financial assistance for marketplace coverage. It explores the demographic characteristics of this group, including state-level estimates.

Northwell, Conversa Health join forces to provide employers with Covid-19 screening tool

A subsidiary of Northwell Health has collaborated with the virtual care company to offer businesses a Covid-19 screening tool for their workers. The tool helps identify employees who may have been exposed to the new coronavirus or those showing symptoms of the disease and suggests next steps.

Premiums and Worker Contributions Among Workers Covered by Employer-Sponsored Coverage, 1999-2020

This graphing tool allows users to explore trends in workplace-sponsored health insurance premiums and worker contributions over time for different categories of employers based on results from the annual Employer Health Benefits Survey. Breakouts are available by firm size, region and industry, as well as for firms with relatively few or many part-time workers, higher- …

Premiums and Worker Contributions Among Workers Covered by Employer-Sponsored Coverage, 1999-2020 Read More »

Average Family Premiums Rose 4% to $21,342 in 2020, Benchmark KFF Employer Health Benefit Survey Finds

San Francisco – Annual family premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance rose 4% to average $21,342 this year, according to the 2020 benchmark KFF Employer Health Benefits Survey. On average, workers this year are contributing $5,588 toward the cost of family coverage, with employers paying the rest. The survey was conducted from January to July as…More

2020 Employer Health Benefits Survey

This annual survey of employers provides a detailed look at trends in employer-sponsored health coverage, including premiums, employee contributions, cost-sharing provisions, offer rates, wellness programs, and employer practices. Annual premiums for employer-sponsored family health coverage reached $21,342 this year, up 4% from last year, with workers on average paying $5,588 toward the cost of their …

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More Than 3 Million People Age 65 or Older Live with School-Age Children, and Could Be at Heightened Risk of COVID-19 Infection if Children Bring the Virus Home from School

About 3.3 million adults age 65 or older live in a household with school-age children, a factor that state and local officials may want to take into account when deciding when and how fully to re-open schools this fall, a new KFF analysis finds. These older adults, who represent roughly six percent of all seniors…More

Millions of Seniors Live In Households with School-Age Children

About 3.3 million adults age 65 or older live in a household with school-age children, a factor that state and local officials may want to take into account when deciding when and how fully to re-open schools this fall, a new KFF analysis finds. These older adults, who represent roughly 6 percent of all seniors …

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