FCC Unveils 14 Initial Projects Selected for $100M Connected Care Pilot Program

FCC COVID-19 Telehealth Program Providers

What You Should Know:

– FCC announces initial 14 pilot project selected for $100M Connected Care Pilot Program that will support connected care service across the country and focus on low-income and veteran patients.


The Federal Communications
Commission (FCC)
today announced an initial set of 14 pilot projects with
over 150 treatment sites in 11 states that have been selected for the Connected
Care Pilot Program
.  A total of $26.6 million will be awarded to these
applicants for proposed projects to treat nearly half a million patients in
both urban and rural parts of the country. 


Connected Care Pilot Program Background

Overall, this Pilot Program will make available up to $100
million over a three-year period for selected pilot projects for qualifying
purchases necessary to provide connected care services, with a particular
emphasis on providing connected care services to low-income and veteran
patients.  

The Pilot
Program will use Universal Service Fund monies to help defray the costs of
connected care services for eligible health care providers, providing support
for 85% of the cost of eligible services and network equipment, which include:

1. patient
broadband Internet access services

2. health care
provider broadband data connections

3. other
connected care information services

4. certain
network equipment

These pilot projects will address a variety of critical
health issues such as high-risk pregnancy, mental health conditions, and opioid
dependency, among others. Here is the list initial list of healthcare providers
that were selected into the Pilot Program:

Banyan Community Health Center, Inc.,
Coral Gables, FL.
 
Banyan Community Health Center’s pilot project seeks $911,833 to provide
patient-based Internet-connected remote monitoring, video visits or consults,
and other diagnostics and services to low-income and veteran patients who are
suffering from chronic/long-term conditions, high-risk pregnancy, infectious
disease including COVID-19, mental health conditions, and opioid
dependency.  Banyan Community Health Center plans to serve an estimated
20,847 patients in Miami, Florida, 85% of which are low-income or veteran
patients.

Duke University Health System, Durham,
NC.
  Duke
University Health System’s pilot project seeks $1,464,759 to provide remote
patient monitoring and video visits or consults to a large number of low-income
patients suffering from heart failure, cancer, and infectious diseases. 
Duke University Health System’s pilot project plans to serve an estimated
16,000 patients in North Carolina, of which 25% are low-income.

Geisinger, consortium with sites in
Lewiston, PA; Danville, PA; Jersey Shore, PA; Bloomsburg, PA; Coal Township,
PA; and Wilkes-Barre, PA.
 
Geisinger’s pilot project seeks $1,739,100 in support to provide connected care
services and remote patient monitoring to low-income patients in rural
communities in Pennsylvania.  Geisinger’s pilot project would serve an
estimated 1,000 patients and would focus on chronic disease management and
high-risk pregnancies, while also treating infectious disease and behavioral
health conditions.  Through its pilot program, Geisinger plans to directly
connect all participating patients, 100% of whom are low-income, with broadband
Internet access service. 

Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA.  Grady Health System’s pilot
project seeks $635,596 to provide Internet connectivity to an estimated 1,896
primarily low-income and high-risk patients who are unable to utilize video
telemedicine services due to lack of a reliable network connection in
Atlanta.  The program will focus on using connected care services such as
patient remote monitoring and video visits/consults to treat vulnerable
patients with conditions such as congestive heart failure, COVID19,
hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and HIV. 

Intermountain Centers for Human
Development, consortium with sites in Casa Grande, AZ; Nogales, AZ; Coolidge,
AZ; and Eloy, AZ. 
 Intermountain
Centers for Human Development’s pilot project seeks $237,150 in support to
treat mental health conditions, opioid dependency, and other substance abuse
disorders.  The pilot project plans to serve 3,400 patients in Arizona,
including rural areas, of which 90% are low-income.

MA FQHC Telehealth Consortium,
consortium with 76 sites in Massachusetts.
  MA FQHC Telehealth Consortium’s pilot project
seeks $3,121,879 in support to provide mental health and substance abuse
disorder treatment through remote patient monitoring, video visits, and other
remote treatment to patients in Massachusetts, including significant numbers of
veterans and low-income patients.  The pilot project will expand access to
these services by leveraging program funding to increase bandwidth at its
sites, and to provide patients with mobile hotspots.  This project would
serve 75,000 patients through 76 federally qualified health centers in
Massachusetts, including rural areas, with an intended patient population of
61.5% low-income or veteran patients.

Mountain Valley Health Center,
consortium with 7 sites in Northeastern California.
  Mountain Valley Health Center’s
pilot project seeks $550,800 in support to provide telehealth capabilities and
in-home monitoring of patients with hypertension and diabetes.  Mountain
Valley’s pilot project plans to serve an estimated 200 patients in rural
Northeastern California, of which at least 24% will be low-income patients and
10% will be veteran patients.

Neighborhood Healthcare – Escondido,
Escondido, CA, Neighborhood Healthcare – Valley Parkway, Escondido, CA,
Neighborhood Healthcare – El Cajon, El Cajon, CA, Neighborhood Healthcare –
Temecula, Temecula, CA, Neighborhood Healthcare – Pauma Valley, Pauma Valley,
CA.
  Neighborhood
Healthcare’s pilot project seeks $129,744 to provide patient broadband access
to primarily low-income patients suffering from chronic and long-term
conditions (e.g., diabetes and high blood pressure).  Neighborhood
Healthcare’s collective project plans to serve an estimated 339 patients, 97%
of which are low-income patients, in five sites serving Riverside and San Diego
counties.

OCHIN, Inc., consortium with 15 sites in
Ohio, 16 sites in Oregon, and 13 sites in Washington.
  OCHIN’s pilot project seeks
$5,834,620 in support to lead a consortium of 44 providers in Ohio, Oregon, and
Washington, encompassing 8 federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) serving
rural, urban, and tribal communities.  OCHIN’s pilot project will provide
patient broadband Internet access service and wireless connections directly to
an estimated 3,450 low-income patients to access connected care services,
including video visits, patient-based Internet-connected patient monitoring,
and remote treatment and will deliver care to treat high-risk pregnancy,
maternal health conditions, mental health conditions, and chronic and long-term
conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. 

Phoebe Worth Medical Center – Camilla
Clinic, Camilla, GA; Phoebe Physicians Group Inc – PPC of Buena Vista, Buena
Vista, GA; Phoebe Physicians Group – Ellaville Primary Medicine Center,
Ellaville, GA; Phoebe Physicians dba Phoebe Family Medicine & Sports
Medicine, Americus, GA; Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital, Albany, GA; Phoebe
Putney Memorial Hospital dba Phoebe Family Medicine – Sylvester, Sylvester, GA.
  The Phoebe Putney Health System
projects seek $673,200 to provide patient-based Internet-connected remote
monitoring, video visits, and remote treatment for low-income patients
suffering from chronic conditions or mental health conditions.  These projects
plan to serve an estimated 4,007 patients, approximately 1,000 of which will be
low-income patients in six sites serving southwest Georgia. 

Summit Pacific Medical Center, Elma, WA.  Summit Pacific Medical Center’s
pilot program seeks $169,977 in support to provide patient-based
Internet-connected remote monitoring, other monitoring services, video visits,
diagnostic imaging, remote treatment and other services for veterans and
low-income patients suffering from chronic conditions, infectious diseases,
mental health conditions, and opioid dependency.  Summit Pacific Medical
Center’s pilot project would serve an estimated 25 patients in Elma,
Washington, 100% of which would be low-income or veteran patients.

Temple University Hospital,
Philadelphia, PA.
 
Temple University Hospital’s pilot project seeks $4,254,250 to provide
patient-based Internet connected remote monitoring and video visits to
patients, including low-income patients, suffering from chronic/long-term
conditions and mental health conditions.  This pilot project plans to
serve an estimated 100,000 patients in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 45% of which
are low-income patients. 

University of Mississippi Medical
Center, Jackson, MS.
 
The University of Mississippi Medical Center’s (UMMC) pilot project seeks
$2,377,875 in support to provide broadband Internet access service to patients,
enabling remote patient monitoring technologies and ambulatory telehealth
visits to low-income patients suffering from chronic conditions or illnesses
requiring long-term care.  UMMC’s pilot project would impact an estimated
237,120 patients across Mississippi and serve up to 6,000 patients
directly.  Of these patients, UMMC estimates that 52% would be low-income.

University of Virginia Health System,
Charlottesville, VA. 
 The
University of Virginia (UVA) Health System’s pilot project seeks $4,462,500 in
support to expand the deployment of remote patient monitoring and telehealth
services to an estimated 17,000 patients across Virginia, nearly 30% of whom
will be low-income.  The UVA Health System pilot project will support
patient broadband and information services, including systems to capture,
transmit, and store patient data to allow remote patient monitoring, two-way
video, and patient scheduling. 

More Than 45 Million Medical Images Are Openly Accessible Online

More Than 45 Million Medical Images Are Openly Accessible Online

What You Should Know:

– CybelAngel tools scanned approximately 4.3 billion IP addresses and detected more than 45 million unique medical images left exposed on over 2,140 unprotected servers across 67 countries including the US, UK, and Germany.

– The report highlights the security risks of publicly accessible images containing highly personal information including ransomware and blackmail.


The analyst team at CybelAngel, a global leader in digital risk protection, has discovered that more than 45 million medical imaging files – including X-rays and CT scans – are freely accessible on unprotected servers, in a new research report.

Medical Device Data Leaks

The report “Full Body
Exposure
” is the result of a six-month investigation into Network Attached
Storage (NAS) and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), the
de facto standard used by healthcare professionals to send and receive medical
data. The analysts discovered millions of sensitive images, including personal
healthcare information (PHI), were available unencrypted and without password
protection.

CybelAngel tools scanned approximately 4.3 billion IP addresses and detected more than 45 million unique medical images left exposed on over 2,140 unprotected servers across 67 countries including the US, UK, and Germany.

The analysts found that openly available medical images, including up to 200 lines of metadata per record which included PII (personally identifiable information; name, birth date, address, etc.) and PHI (height, weight, diagnosis, etc.), could be accessed without the need for a username or password. In some instances, login portals accepted blank usernames and passwords.

“The fact that we did not use any hacking tools throughout our research highlights the ease with which we were able to discover and access these files,” says David Sygula, Senior Cybersecurity Analyst at CybelAngel and author of the report. “This is a concerning discovery and proves that more stringent security processes must be put in place to protect how sensitive medical data is shared and stored by healthcare professionals. A balance between security and accessibility is imperative to prevent leaks from becoming a major data breach.”

3 Steps to Safeguard The Way Providers Share & Store
Data

CybelAngel advises there are simple steps that healthcare facilities can take to safeguard the way they share and store data including:

– Determine if pandemic response exceeds your security policies: Ad hoc NAS devices, file-sharing apps, and contractors may take data beyond your ability to enforce access controls

– Ensure proper network segmentation of connected medical
imaging equipment: Minimize any exposure critical diagnostic equipment and
supporting systems have to wider business or public networks

– Conduct real-world audit of third-party partners: Assess
which parties may be unmanaged or not in compliance with required policies and
protocols.

– CybelAngel provides a complimentary, comprehensive 30-day
data exposure assessment healthcare and other organizations use to measure
their risk and uncover priority issues.

Nuance Sells Off Transcription and EHR-Go-Live Services Businesses to DeliverHealth

Nuance Sells Off Transcription and EHR-Go-Live Services Businesses to DeliverHealth

What You Should Know:

–   Nuance announced that it’s planning to sell
two sections of its healthcare business – Health Information Management (HIM)
and Electronic Health Record (EHR) Go-Live Services – to a new independent
company, called DeliverHealth, in early 2021.

– Nuance will be a minority shareholder of DeliverHealth
and continue to provide its technology to the company.

Nuance
Communications, Inc.,
today announced the planned sale
of the Health Information Management (HIM) Transcription business and the
Electronic Health Record (EHR) Go-Live Services business to a new independent
company, DeliverHealth Solutions LLC
(DeliverHealth),
formed by Assured
Healthcare Partners® (AHP®)
in partnership with Aeries Technology Group (Aeries).  


Transaction Details

The HIM Transcription business includes both Nuance Transcription Services (NTS) and the eScription technology platform. The transaction is expected to be completed in early 2021. As part of the self-off, Nuance will be a minority shareholder of DeliverHealth and will continue to provide its technology to the company. DeliverHealth plans to build on HIM, transcription, technology and EHR services already in place while expanding into intelligent, technology-enabled revenue cycle automation and clinical documentation improvement services within the EHR’s workflow in 2021. DeliverHealth will include both Nuance Transcription Services (NTS) and the eScription technology platform. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed.


Sell-Off Accelerate Growth as Conversational AI Market
Leader

 The sale
demonstrates Nuance’s continuing execution to focus R&D investments in the
healthcare and enterprise markets – where the company has substantial
competitive advantages and opportunities for growth and value creation. In
2019, for example, Nuance sold its document imaging business to Kofax and
spun-off its automotive business into Cerence, Inc., an independent,
publicly-traded company.

Nuance’s goal with the sale is to enable:

– Existing customers with continued service quality, newly
expanded offerings, and enhancements from DeliverHealth in close collaboration
with Nuance

– Nuance to focus its innovation and market resources as a
pure-play conversational AI market leader while providing continuity of EHR
Go-Live Services and HIM Transcription businesses to existing and new customers
via DeliverHealth

– DeliverHealth to leverage a leading position in healthcare
professional and technology-enabled services, expand global market share,
advance growth plans for the EHR Go-Live and Optimization Services, and provide
enhanced HIM technology and services to a worldwide market in partnership with
Nuance

Nuance’s growth and market leadership in healthcare are
driven by the accelerating adoption and development of its core cloud-based AI
solutions, including the Nuance® Dragon® Ambient eXperience™ (Nuance DAX™)
ambient clinical intelligence (ACI) solution, Nuance Dragon Medical One, Nuance
CDE One, and its array of diagnostic imaging solutions such as PowerScribe One™
and PowerShare™.


“The dramatic acceleration in the digital transformation of healthcare continues as organizations deploy the power of conversational AI and deeply integrated cloud-based solutions at scale to address physician burnout, expand patient access, and improve system efficiencies and the revenue cycle,” said Mark Benjamin, CEO of Nuance. “With this strategic transaction, we’re aligning our resources to increase our market and technical leadership position in high-growth, high-impact areas that help our customers in a transformative way to improve patient care and operational performance. At the same time, we’re enabling the medical transcription and EHR Go-Live Services businesses to reach their full potential as a separate, focused company benefiting from the enhanced investment and operational experience of AHP and Aeries and technology support from Nuance.”


Mobile Point-of-Care Ultrasound Is Now A Frontline Warrior in Pandemic

Point-of-Care Ultrasounds is Now a Frontline Warrior in Battling The Pandemic
Diku Mandavia, M.D., SVP, Chief Medical Officer at FUJIFILM Sonosite

Health authorities need to prioritize delivery and the repurposing of mobile point-of-care ultrasound machines which have proven to be reliable, affordable, and effective in saving the lives of coronavirus patients.  


Most Americans are familiar with ultrasound technology from the scans done to check on the status of the fetus during pregnancy.  

But far fewer are aware of how valuable mobile versions of these units have also become in America’s emergency rooms where they almost instantly detect and record everything from internal bleeding, abdominal pain to life-threatening infections. 

In recent days, mobile units have suddenly become a critical global technology for scanning the chests of coronavirus victims to precisely monitor the condition of their lungs.  

We now need to raise the status of these life-saving diagnostic machines, finding and rushing them to the frontlines of hospitals where coronavirus patients are triaged and cared for.

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, there had been elevated global demand for these mobile – called “point of care” – units that can be brought to the bedside.  Some are small handheld devices that instantly connect to a smartphone.  

International relief organizations and national health authorities have issued urgent calls to manufacturers in the last few days for any surplus or underutilized ultrasound equipment capable of performing lung scans.  They are also seeking point-of-care ultrasound units that are underutilized or are in “retired” inventory at clinics and hospitals around the world, units that can be adapted for use in lung ultrasound (LU) diagnosis.  

Sales and maintenance records from manufacturers may also be used to track down operational LU machines that are already in-country and can be drafted into urgent service during the pandemic.

Because the most desired devices are mobile and move from patient to patient, very strict hygienic procedures must be carefully monitored and managed.  

As with so many technical innovations over the past half-century, taking the technology mobile was originally funded by one of the smallest but most consequential units in our U.S. military arsenal: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).  

DARPA didn’t invent ultrasound, but it did help shrink the technology to mobile size so that frontline military physicians could take the technology closer to the battlefield and save the lives of wounded warriors.  These mobile units, now ubiquitous in ICUs and in emergency rooms around the world, are much cheaper and lower risk than radiography (x-ray) units which are difficult to maneuver to the bedside of the critically ill especially with diseases as transmittable as a coronavirus.  

It turns out that these popular mobile units provide particularly precise views of distressed lungs – important tools to have when doctors need to see the exact progression of the COVID-19 virus in infected patients who are quarantined and unable to be safely moved to a remote radiology suite.  COVID-19 often presents as a respiratory invader that causes acute inflammation in the lungs, primarily as a patchy, interstitial infiltrate – a condition recognized with ultrasound imaging.  

A small but important study was just published in Radiology by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) on March 13 which comes from other doctors also on the coronavirus frontlines in Italy.  

That report – covering the records of emergency physicians at Ospedale Guglielmo da Saliceto in Piacenza, Italy – claims a “strong correlation” between lung ultrasound and CT findings in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, leading the investigators to “strongly recommend the use of bedside [ultrasound] for the early diagnosis of COVID-19 patients who present to the emergency department.”

Pneumonia and respiratory failure are a principal cause of death among COVID-19 patients.  What we can assess in a lung ultrasound right now in these patients is the involvement of both lungs with basically patchy findings.  Distinctive to the disease is typically ultrasonographic B lines – wide bands of hyperechoic artifacts that are often compared to the beam of a flashlight being swung back and forth.  

If there is a significant consolidation, diagnostics may also capture imagery of hepatization of the lung.  This information is critical to monitoring, addressing, and curing pneumonia.

For these patients and hospitals in crisis, mobile lung-ultrasound units are also scanning far more patients in a short period of time than more elaborate diagnostic imaging technologies, while delivering an accurate, actionable answer on the presence and degree of infection.  

Lung ultrasound is a critical application of the point-of-care mobile units in the emergency rooms battling COVID-19 around the world, but these patients very sick with COVID-19 may also need venous access under ultrasound guidance to administer fluids and medications.  Or they may be in shock and need a shock assessment, for which point-of-care ultrasound in COVID-19 resuscitation bays and ICUs are also very useful.

The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to get worse in the U.S. before it gets better.  New York, California, and the State of Washington have set up military-style hospitals  – 250-bed infirmaries that will be fully functional hospitals for COVID-19 patients – and will be placing point-of-care ultrasound there and elsewhere where it would be much more difficult to put a CT scanner.

The challenge in meeting that urgent goal is whether we can find and deploy enough functional lung ultrasound devices to COVID-19 responders in the next several weeks to save lives that are already in danger and restore COVID-19 patients alive and well to families desperate for medical rescue.  I believe we can and will.


About Diku Mandavia, M.D.

Diku Mandavia, M.D. is the Senior Vice President, Chief Medical Officer, at FUJIFILM Sonosite Inc., and FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.  He completed his residency in emergency medicine at LAC+USC Medical Center in Los Angeles where he still practices part-time. He is a Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Southern California.


Sony Updates NUCLeUS Medical Imaging Platform to Support Remote Patient Observation

Sony Updates NUCLeUS Medical Imaging Platform to Support Remote Patient Observation

What You Should Know:

– Today, Sony announced an update to our NUCLeUS medical
imaging platform, which improves support for remote patient observation.

– NUCLeUS has added new functionality and features,
including powerful bi-directional telestration capabilities allowing multiple
remote users to simultaneously annotate, draw or highlight areas of interest in
a live stream video or still image.

Sony today
announced an update to its vendor-neutral medical imaging platform NUCLeUS. The latest release introduces Remote
Patient Monitoring (observation) functionality with recording functionalities
for use in the operating room (OR), Intensive Care Units (ICU), endoscopy
suites, procedure rooms or anywhere else in the hospital.

The Smart Digital Imaging Platform for Medical Environments

Sony Updates NUCLeUS Medical Imaging Platform to Support Remote Patient Observation

Developed in consultation with leading surgeons and with vendor
neutrality in mind, NUCLeUS guides clinical staff through the planning,
recording and sharing of video, still images and other patient-related data.
Seamlessly linking Sony and third-party devices, applications, video and most
importantly, people, NUCLeUS focuses on hospital staff requirements and use
cases, adding value to imaging workflows.

New
Bi-Directional Telestration Capabilities

NUCLeUS has added
new functionality and features, including powerful bi-directional telestration
capabilities allowing multiple remote users to simultaneously annotate, draw or
highlight areas of interest in a live stream video or still image. This can be
securely shared with authorized viewers to discuss as a group in real time,
ideally suited for socially distanced environments.  Equipped with a full
set of recording functionalities, NUCLeUS is also a valuable tool for
hospitals, outpatient surgery centers and private practices serving a variety
of specialties including Urology, ENT, Obstetrics, Ophthalmic, Plastic surgery,
and Robotics

New NUCLeUS Functionality Features

New functionalities of NUCLeUS include:

Mosaic
Video Wall,

presenting video streams from image sources in multiple ORs and ICUs
simultaneously on a single display, thus providing a situational overview of
activity in a tiled or mosaic format.

An
iPad Streaming function,
allowing clinical staff to access images from any modality via
an iPad in virtual real time within the OR, so medical staff can follow the
intervention on their handheld device.

High
quality 4K conversion
, allowing any HD resolution video content to be converted to 4K
using advanced resolution-augmentation algorithms superior to conventional
upscaling, giving a crisp ultra-high resolution view of converted video
footage.

Customizable
Expanded Patient Distraction
– helping to reduce patient anxiety through music tracks and
video imagery that can be played in the OR to create a more relaxing and
comfortable atmosphere.

Patient
Time-Out Functionality
, featuring checklists that simplify time out of safety
standards at the start, during and end of an operation.

Enhanced
Printing capabilities
, allowing hard copies of still images captured by NUCLeUS to be
created inside the OR using an optional UP-DR80MD A4 digital color printer. The
Auto Print function also extends CMS (Content Management System) print
functionality to collect a preconfigured number of stills, printing them
automatically.

Full
compatibility
with the latest Sony PTZ and fixed cameras including HD and 4K
models.

“Sony is committed to developing NUCLeUS to suit the needs of patients and medical staff at all times,” said Theresa Alesso, pro division President, Sony Electronics.  “The Remote Patient Monitoring capabilities within NUCLeUS are a primary example of this and were developed to help hospitals manage day-to-day requirements through the COVID-19 pandemic.  We are committed to helping hospitals and healthcare providers reinvent their workflows and provide medical staff with the tools they need to continue delivering excellent patient care.”

Will Nanox Disrupt The X-ray Systems Market?

Will Nanox Disrupt the X-ray Systems Market?

With its share price falling from more than $66 to less than $24, September was a tumultuous month for Nanox.

On August 25th, the medical imaging start-up closed its initial public offering, having raised $190m from the sale of 10,555,556 ordinary shares at a price of $18 each. Money poured in as investors were sold on Nanox’s cold cathode x-ray source and the subsequent reduction in costs that it would enable, as well as the vendor’s pay-per-scan pricing model that would let the company access new, untapped markets.

A week later the shares were being traded for almost double their opening amount, and by the 11th of September, they had reached a peak of $66.67. This meteoric rise soon came to an end though, as activist short-seller Andrew Left of Citron Research published a report comparing the Israeli start-up to disgraced medical testing firm Theranos and asserted that the company’s shares were worthless.

Other commentators added to Left’s criticism, causing investors to abandon the stock. Class action lawsuits followed, with legal firms hoping to defend shareholders against the imaging company’s alleged fabrication of commercial agreements and of misleading investors.

Nanox defended itself against the Citron attack, insisting that the allegations in the report are ‘completely without merit’, but the extra scrutiny and threat of legal repercussions have left the share price continuing to plummet, falling to $23.52 at month’s end.

Vendor Impact

– New business and payment models could capture demand from new customers in untapped and emerging markets

– Vendors should be reactive. A successful launch of Nanox’s X-ray system could channel more focus and resources on the portfolio of low-end X-ray systems

– Once established, recurring services are hard to displace

– However, brand loyalty and hard-earned reputations aren’t easily forgotten

Market Impact

– Potential for disruptive technology to expand access to medical imaging and provide affordable X-ray digital solutions, delivering a significant and rapid overall market expansion

– New customer bases could have less expertise and a lack of trained professionals – ease of use becomes a critical feature

– Where X-ray system price is a battleground, and a fundamental factor driving purchasing decisions, Nanox’s proposed ecosystem offers revenue-generating opportunities

The Signify View

Assessing the viability and long-term potential of any business is a dangerous game, doubly so if it depends on a closely guarded game-changing technological innovation as is the case with Nanox. Fortunes are won and lost on a daily basis by investors, speculators, and gamblers trying to get in on the ground floor of the next ground-breaking company after being convinced by slick presentations and thorough prospectuses.

There is likely merit in some of the arguments being put forward by those on either side of the Nanox debate. For example, the lack of peer-reviewed journal articles about new technology is questionable. But, the skepticism around the feasibility of Nanox’s technology seems to ignore that research into cold-cathode x-ray generation, the cornerstone of Nanox’s offering has been ongoing for numerous years, and isn’t as out of the blue as the naysayers may suggest.

Regardless of these and other specifics in the ongoing fracas between short-sellers, Nanox, investors, and lawyers, all of whom have their own agendas, the voracity with which the stocks were initially purchased shows the keen appetite investors have for a company that would bring disruption to the X-ray systems market.

When delving into Signify Research’s data on this market, it is easy to see why. Across many developed and mature regions, the market has become relatively stable. It is one of replacement and renewal rather than selling to new customers and increasing the accessibility of X-ray imaging. Developed markets do continue to drive growth for X-ray manufacturers to some extent, particularly as a result of digitalization and favored reimbursement for digital X-ray imaging.  However, by and large, the market remains broadly flat, with a CAGR of just 2.7% forecast for the period 2018-2023.

nanox image

Figure 1: While there are some growth areas, the X-ray market as a whole is very stable

New business

Nanox has strong ambitions to outperform this underwhelming outlook by utilizing its unique and more affordable technology to offer a relatively feature-rich system, dubbed the Arc, at a far lower price than existing digital X-ray systems. Competing on price is only one part of the equation, however.

After all, there are countries where, despite their economies of scale, the multi-national market leaders in medical imaging are unable to compete with domestic manufacturers, which are able to produce X-ray systems locally, with lower overheads, and no importation costs. Globally, there are also a large number of smaller imaging vendors, which have limited, yet low-cost offerings at the value end of the market, with this increased competition driving down average selling prices.

To differentiate itself further, Nanox also plans to launch with a completely new business model. Instead of traditional transactional sales, which see providers simply purchase and pay the full cost of the imaging system in one installment, use the system for the entire shelf life of the product and then replace with an equivalent model, Nanox plans to retain ownership of its machines, but charge providers to use them on a pay-per-scan basis.

There are some regions and some situations where legislation and other factors make this model unfeasible, so Nanox will also make its products available to purchase outright, as well as licensing its technology to other firms. However, the start-up’s focus is on offering medical imaging as a service.

The company says that this shift from a CapEx to a managed service approach means that instead of competing with established vendors over market share, it will be able to expand the total market, enabling access to imaging systems in settings where they have been hitherto absent, with urgent care units, outpatient clinics, and nursing homes being suggested as targets.

According to the Nanox investor’s prospectus, current contracts already secured (although the legitimacy of these deals is one of the issues raised by the short-sellers) feature a $40 per scan cost, of which Nanox receives $14 – although the exact figure varies depending on regional economics. The contracts feature a minimum service fee equivalent to seven scans a day, although the target is somewhat higher, with each machine expected to be used to produce 20 scans a day, for 23 days a month.

If Nanox’s order book is as valid as the company insists, and it already has deals for 5,150 units in place, each system will consequently be bringing in a minimum of $27,048 dollars per year for a minimum total revenue of $139m. If the systems are used 20 times a day as Nanox hopes, that means almost $400m in sticky recurring revenues annually. To put that in perspective, one of the market leaders for X-ray imaging systems in 2018 was Siemens Healthineers, which turned over almost $2.8bn across its general radiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, mobile, angiography, and CT imaging divisions.

With an order book that is, on the face of it, this healthy, there have been questions as to why Nanox went public at all, but the listing may be required for this business model to work. The Israeli vendor says that the vast majority of the investment will be sunk into producing the Nanox scanners, and the associated manufacturing capacity. This is necessary because unlike other imaging companies selling systems on a CapEx basis, Nanox will receive nothing for delivering scanners to customers. Revenue is generated later as the systems are used.

This means that the company is effectively fronting the initial cost of the systems, so needs to get as many units installed and being used as quickly as possible to recoup its initial costs. Unlike other vendors, it cannot rely on sales of a first tranche to fund the second and so on, in its new managed service model, it is better to mass produce everything at once.

Open to exposure

There is, however, nothing to stop other, established players from switching to a similar model. This should be of concern to Nanox, after all, Siemens Healthineers or GE Healthcare already have the manufacturing capacity and capital ready to offer products in a similar way.

And of course, Nanox, shouldn’t underestimate the difficulty of disrupting a long-established market. Despite ample funding and solid products, other companies are still struggling to make an impact in other markets. For example, Butterfly Network, a vendor offering an affordable handheld ultrasound solution, has a valuation of over $1 billion and has received more than $350m in funding.

In 2019, the company turned over $28m, enough to make it the market leader in the nascent handheld category, but in a global ultrasound market worth almost $7bn, at present, it is little more than a drop in the ocean.

Nanox hopes that its own new business model would be disruptive by opening up the market to a far greater range of customers than are currently served. A nursing home, for example, might not be able or willing to allocate the cost of a CT machine from a single year’s budget, but spreading that cost as the scanner is used, and particularly if that cost is passed on to patients at a time of use, on-site imaging suddenly becomes a far more feasible proposition.

What’s more, if a company was able to increase its product’s user base there is a strong possibility for upselling additional services, software, and tools. These could be things like AI modules that increase workflow efficiency, or, especially pertinent given the pricing model could allow machines to be installed in new settings that lack on-site expertise, tools that aid clinical decision making.

Beyond that, there is also ample scope for an imaging vendor to entice a customer into its ecosystem with a scanner that has no cost at the point of delivery, before getting it to commit to its own PACS and other IT systems. Being able to fully exploit these new customers relies, in the first instance, on being able to get a foot in the door. That is why an imaging service model could be so beneficial, even if the returns on the scans themselves aren’t especially lucrative.

Features first

While adopting a new business model and securing revenue from add-ons and upselling would help established vendors countenance the price differential Nanox proposes, if we are to take the start-up at its word, addressing its feature set might be another matter entirely.

As well as just providing imaging hardware, Nanox is offering a service that, at face value, is more complete. The Arc automatically uploads all imaging data to its cloud SaaS platform. This platform would initially use AI systems to ‘provide first response and decision assistive information’ before radiologists could provide final diagnoses that could then be shared with hospitals in real-time.

Fig2

Figure 2: With teleradiology read volumes increasing, it makes sense that the necessary hardware comes baked into the Arc

There is currently limited information available about the exact nature of the so-called Nanox.CLOUD and its integration with the Arc, although several assumptions can be made:

– Firstly, although built-in connectivity is being touted as a feature with clinical benefits, its inclusion is as likely to be a necessity as a design choice, given that Nanox presumably needs to be able to communicate with the systems in order to find out scan volumes and bill accordingly. Or, more drastically, render the system inoperable if people don’t keep up with payments.

– Another assumption that can be made is that the full suite of tools wouldn’t be included in the basic pay-per-scan fee. Signify’s Teleradiology World – 2020 report found that in 2020, the average revenue per read for a teleradiology platform is, in North America for example, $24.40. As such, teleradiology services would only be able to be offered at an additional cost, creating another revenue stream for Nanox.

– Another sticking point could also be Nanox’s promise to enable the integration of its cloud into existing medical systems, via APIs. While well and good in theory, the competitiveness, complexity, and proprietary nature of many medical imaging workflows, combined with the fact that many vendors have absolutely no incentive to make integration easy for the newcomer, mean that in practice, it is likely to either be a prohibitively expensive, or frustratingly limited offering. This is one area where established vendors, which already offer comprehensive medical imaging packages, have a distinct advantage.

Back down to Earth

The short positions promoted by commentators including Citron Research and Muddy Waters Research postulate that the Nanox.ARC scanner isn’t real. There are some legitimate questions, but running through their papers is also an attitude that Nanox’s claims are simply implausible, whether that is because it has an R&D budget a fraction of the size of GE, or because anonymous radiologists unrelated to the company haven’t seen anything like it before.

It is worth remembering, though, that these short sellers will benefit financially if Nanox slumps. Nanox conversely, is obviously financially incentivized to promote its technology and its potential, and it wouldn’t be the first company, to promote the limited fruits of its start-up labor in a flattering light.

As so often happens in these he said, she said situations, the truth could well lie somewhere between the two extremes. Even in this instance, even if Nanox fails to deliver on some of its more impressive promises, the fact is, it has suggested bringing a whole new customer base into play and laid out a strategy for selling to them.

With that being the case, for a big vendor the issue of whether Nanox is legitimate almost becomes moot, their focus should be what these other customers require, how to get these customers into their product ecosystems, and what add-on products, and additional services they can feasibly sell them at a later date.

If nothing else, the entire Nanox furor shows that to achieve growth in mature markets, a vendor’s innovation needs to extend beyond its products.


About Alan Stoddart

Alan Stoddart is the Editor at Signify Research, a UK-based market research firm focusing on health IT, digital health, and medical imaging. Alan joined Signify Research in 2020, using his editorial expertise to lead on the company’s insight and analysis services. 

Fujifilm & Volpara Partner to Help Clinicians Determine Patient Breast Density

Fujifilm & Volpara Partner to Help Clinicians Determine Patient Breast Density

What You Should Know:

– FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. and Volpara
Solutions announced the extension of their partnership to provide mammography
facilities and clinicians with breast imaging solutions designed to improve
image quality, streamline workflow and accurately assess a patient’s breast
density.

– Building on a successful 6-year partnership, Fujifilm’s
customers using ASPIRE Cristalle with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) now
have access to the latest innovations from Volpara’s Breast Health Platform.


FUJIFILM
Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc., 
a provider of diagnostic imaging
and medical informatics solutions, and Volpara Solutions, a
purpose-driven software company on a mission to prevent advanced-stage breast
cancer, today announced an expanded partnership to provide mammography
facilities and clinicians with breast imaging solutions designed to improve
image quality, streamline workflow and accurately assess a patient’s breast
density.

Building on a successful 6-year partnership, Fujifilm’s
customers using ASPIRE
Cristalle 
with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) will now have access
to the latest innovations from Volpara’s Breast Health Platform. Volpara®Live!
helps reduce patient recalls due to poor image quality by giving mammographers
instant feedback on positioning and compression—which the FDA attributes as the
cause of most image deficiencies—for adjustment before the patient leaves the
room. Volpara Enterprise provides a comprehensive analysis of quality on
every mammogram and tomosynthesis image taken at the facility to identify
opportunities for improvement.

Early Detection is Critical to Breast Cancer Survival

Dense breast tissue is associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Volpara’s  Enterprise includes a module that uses proprietary x-ray physics, AI, and machine learning to generate an accurate volumetric measure of breast composition. It provides a repeatable, consistent, and objective means of scoring breast density.

“Early detection is critical to breast cancer survival.  It’s essential that clinicians and patients have as many resources available to them to quickly and accurately find any possible signs of disease,” said Christine Murray, Women’s Health Product Manager, FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. “Fujifilm is thrilled to expand our relationship with Volpara Solutions to offer our customers the clinical decision-support tools they need to improve mammography quality and enhance patient care.”  

Change Healthcare Acquires Cloud-Native Imaging Platform Nucleus.io

Change Healthcare Acquires Cloud-Native Imaging Platform Nucleus.io

What You Should Know:

– Change Healthcare acquires Nucleus.io to create the first of its kind end-to-end, cloud-native Enterprise Imaging to integrate Change Healthcare’s next-generation medical imaging platform.

– The acquisition will accelerate Change Healthcare’s
timeline to implement a complete cloud-based, end-to-end Enterprise Imaging
solution with customers by leveraging the 7,500+ organizations Nucleus.io
currently serves.


Change Healthcare (Nasdaq: CHNG) today announced the acquisition of Nucleus.io, a leader in the development of advanced, fully enabled, cloud-native imaging, and workflow technology. Nucleus.io’s state-of-the-art, cloud-native imaging technology, including a zero-footprint diagnostic viewer with patented streaming technology, workflow, and image sharing solutions, completes Change Healthcare’s next-generation medical imaging platform.

Medical Image Exchange Solution

Nucleus.io ingests, stores, routes, and provides lightning-fast access – from just about anywhere – to all medical images regardless of file size. Nucleus.io’s market-leading medical image exchange solution is utilized by over 7,500 organizations across the U.S., with approximately 150 new organizations onboarding each month. Their advanced, fully enabled, cloud-native imaging technology includes a zero-footprint diagnostic viewer with patented streaming technology, workflow, and image sharing solutions, and more.

“We began our journey eight years ago with the goal of improving patient care by using the power of the web to make medical imaging instantly accessible to patients, providers, and hospitals,” said Dr. Vishal Verma, chief executive officer, NucleusHealth. “Change Healthcare was the clear choice when searching for an organization to deliver our technology to the world. We couldn’t be happier about the opportunity to have Change Healthcare bring our unified vision to light.”

Acquisition Creates Complete Cloud-based, End-to-End
Enterprise Imaging Solution

Today’s acquisition supports Change Healthcare’s commitment
to focus on and invest in core aspects of the business to fuel long-term growth
and advance innovation. This will accelerate Change Healthcare’s timeline to
implement a complete cloud-based, end-to-end Enterprise Imaging solution with
customers. Nucleus.io expands Change Healthcare’s addressable market by
leveraging the over 7,500 organizations Nucleus.io currently serves.

Change Healthcare’s Enterprise Imaging Network (EIN) is the
first of its kind, fully managed, cloud-native platform. The foundations of the
platform, including its Archive and Analytics applications, have been
successfully delivered to the market as a cloud-native solution. The
combination of both companies’ technologies and experienced teams will enable
physicians to read, diagnose, and collaborate from anywhere, reduce IT
complexities, and leverage data and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to improve
outcomes.

Why It Matters

“Now more than ever, customers are seeking ways to lower cost, reduce complexity, protect their patient data, and deliver the best care possible. Our next-generation Enterprise Imaging Network platform helps meet those needs in ways not previously possible and delivers exceptional value to our customers,” said Tracy Byers, senior vice president and general manager, Enterprise Imaging, Change Healthcare. “This transaction will accelerate the realization of our vision and the innovation our industry has been waiting for.”

Financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.

M&A Analysis: 3 Benefits of Siemens Healthineers’ $16.4B Acquisition of Varian Medical

M&A Analysis: 3 Benefits of Siemens Healthineers $16.4B Acquisition of Varian Medical

What You Should Know:

– Siemens Healthineers and Varian Medical announce a $16.4B deal in an all-cash transaction on 2nd August 2020.

– Deal expected to close in 1H 2021.

– Varian Medical will maintain its brand name and operate “independently”

– Siemens AG will drop holding in Siemens Healthineers from 85% to 72% as part of the transaction.


News of the deal between Siemens Healthineers and Varian Medical will have caught many industry onlookers off guard on Sunday evening. Flotation of the Healthineers business segment on the German stock market raised a few eyebrows back in 2017, but with Siemens AG retaining 85% of the stock, many observers postulated little change to the fortunes of the well-known business; an unwieldy technical hardware leader facing an uphill battle in an increasingly digital market.

However, the Varian deal has just made it very clear that Siemens Healthineers has emerged from the IPO with big ambitions and firepower to match. So, what does this mean for the future?

Win-win?

Three benefits of the deal are clear at first glance. Firstly, Siemens Healthineers will be adding an additional mature product set to its already strong modality hardware line-up. Radiation Therapy hardware (linear accelerators, or linac), is the lion’s share of Varian’s business, for which it is market leader holding over 55% of the global installed base in 2019. Combining this with Siemens’ extensive business in diagnostic imaging and diagnostics will create a product line-up that no major peer can today match. It also opens up opportunities for providing “end-to-end” oncology solutions (imaging, diagnostics, and therapy) under one vendor, a strong play in a market where health providers are increasingly looking to limit supply chain complexity and explore long-term managed service deals with fewer vendors.

Secondly, Varian is operating in a relatively exclusive market, with its only main competition coming from market peers Elekta and Accuray Inc. Demand for linacs has been consistently improving in recent years, with Varian suggesting only two-thirds of the Total Addressable Market (TAM) for Radiation Therapy has been catered for so far. The acquisition, therefore, opens a new growth market for Siemens Healthineers to offset the gradual slowing demand for its advanced imaging modality (MRI, CT) business, a more competitive and mature segment. The adoption of Radiation Therapy in emerging markets such as China and India is also well behind advanced imaging modalities, offering new greenfield opportunities near term, a rarity in most of Siemens Healthineers’ core markets.

Thirdly, Varian has grown to a size where progressing to the next level of growth will require substantial investment in operations and new market channels. Revenue growth over the last five years has been patchy, though gross margin remains strong for this sector. If Siemens can leverage its far larger operational and sales network and apply it to Varian’s product segments, none of Varian’s current main competitors will have the resources to compete, unless acquired by another major healthcare technology vendor.

The Digital Gem 

While the Radiation Therapy hardware business has gained the most attention for its potential impact on Siemens Healthineers’ business, Varian’s software business is arguably its most valuable jewel, hitting almost $600m and 18% YoY growth in FY19.

Many healthcare providers have become increasingly beleaguered by the challenges of digitalization today, especially in terms of complex integration of diagnostic and clinical applications across the healthcare system. This frustration is especially common in Oncology, which sits at the convergence of major departmental and enterprise IT systems, including the EMR, laboratory, radiology, and surgical segments.

Changing models of care provision towards multidisciplinary collaboration for diagnosis and care have only intensified focus on fixing this issue, with some preferring single-vendor offerings for major clinical or diagnostic departments. The Varian software suite is one of the few premium full-featured oncology IT portfolios available today, competing mostly against main rival Elekta, generalist oncology information system modules from EMR vendors (few of which have the same capability) and a host of smaller standalone specialist IT vendors.

For Siemens Healthineers, the Varian software asset is a great fit. Siemens has for some time been gradually changing direction in its digital strategy, away from large enterprise data management segments towards more targeted diagnostic and operational products. This process began with the sale of its EMR business to Cerner for $1.3B back in 2015, with notably reduced marketing focus and bidding or deal activity on big imaging management deals (PACS, VNA etc.) in North America in recent years.

Instead, Siemens Healthineers has channeled its digital efforts on three main areas where it has specialist capabilities: advanced visualization and access to artificial intelligence for image analysis; digitalization of advanced imaging hardware modalities, including driving efficiency for fleet management and radiology operations; and lab diagnostics automation. While still early in this transformation, this approach is tapping into the main challenges facing most healthcare providers today; improving clinical outcomes at a net neutral or reduced cost, better managing and reducing Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), and implementing autonomous technology to augment clinical and diagnostic practice.

Assuming integration with Siemens’ broader portfolio is not too bumpy, it is already clear how the different software assets of the Varian business sit well with Siemens’ digital strategy. The Aria Oncology Information System platform will provide an entry point for Siemens to build on clinical outcome improvement in Oncology (along with Noona/360 Oncology) while also integrating diagnostic content from the Siemens syngo imaging and AI-radiology applications. Further, with growing attention on operational software to support modality fleet services and radiology operations, Siemens could translate this business into RT linac fleet management, an area currently underserved.

With no competing vendor today able to match this capability in Oncology IT, the potential long-term benefits for Siemens’ digital strategy with Varian far outweigh the risks of integration.

From Morph Suits to Moon-shots

As alluded to in our introduction, perhaps most intriguing is the bullish signal Siemens Healthineers has made to its customers and the wider market about its future.

The Healthineers 2025 strategy identified three clear stages of transformation, with “reinforcing the core portfolio” the key aspect of the 2017-2019 post IPO. In the second phase “upgrading” the business focused on pushing up growth targets and earnings per share across all segments while adding capabilities in allied markets.

Picture9

Judged against the criteria for the “upgrading” phase, the Varian deal has ticked all the boxes, perhaps clarifying why Siemens was willing to pay a premium:

The scale of the deal has also reinforced that the gradual untethering of Siemens Healthineers from its corporate parent Siemens AG is bearing fruit, both in terms of flexibility to deal-make and the ability to use the financial firepower of its majority shareholder for competitive gain.

The deal, once completed in 1H 2021, also now puts Siemens Healthineers in an exclusive club of medical technology companies with annual revenues above $20B, with a potential position as the third-largest public firm globally (based on 2019 revenues, behind Medtronic and Johnson and Johnson).

It is therefore hard to argue that the Varian acquisition can be viewed as anything but positive for Siemens Healthineers. Given the current impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and expected challenging economic legacy, the growth potential of Varian will help to smooth the expected mid-term dip in some core business over the next few years.

Yet it is the intention and message that Siemens Healthineers is sending with the Varian acquisition that has is perhaps most impressive; despite the turmoil and challenges facing markets today, it fundamentally believes in its strategy to reinvent its healthcare business and target precision medicine long term.

Its major competitors should sit up and take note; Siemens Healthineers is fast re-establishing itself as a leading force within healthcare technology. The morph suits of the “Healthineers” brand launch was just one small step on this journey; the Varian acquisition is going to be one great leap.


About Steve Holloway 

Signify Research_Steve Holloway

Steve Holloway is the Director at Signify Research, an independent supplier of market intelligence and consultancy to the global healthcare technology industry. Steve has 9 years of experience in healthcare technology market intelligence, having served as Senior Analyst at InMedica (part of IMS Research) and Associate Director for IHS Inc.’s Healthcare Technology practice. Steve’s areas of expertise include healthcare IT and medical Imaging.

VA, Philips to Create World’s Largest Tele-Critical Care System for Veterans

VA, Philips to Create World’s Largest Tele-Critical Care System for Veterans

What You Should Know:

– U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs selects Philips to create the world’s largest tele-critical care system, further integrating tele-health and delivering quality care for veterans.

– The ten-year contract, which enables
VA to invest up to $100 million with Philips for
tele-critical care technology and services, leverages Philips history of innovation, including research into
technologies that can better support veterans, telehealth, tele-critical care
(eICU), diagnostic imaging, sleep solutions and patient monitoring.


U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has awarded a contract to Philips to expand VA’s tele-critical care program, creating the world’s largest system to provide veterans remote access to intensive care expertise, regardless of their location. The ten-year contract, which enables VA to invest up to $100 million with Philips for tele-critical care technology and services, leverages Philips history of innovation, including research into technologies that can better support veterans, telehealth, tele-critical care (eICU), diagnostic imaging, sleep solutions and patient monitoring.

VA’s Committed Focus to Telehealth for Veterans

VA is
the largest integrated healthcare system in the U.S., consisting of more than
1,700 sites and serving nearly nine million veterans each year. It has become a
leader in developing telehealth services in order to improve access to care and
federate care delivery. In fiscal year 2019 alone, VA delivered more than 2.5
million telehealth episodes. Additionally, VA was able to expand video to home
appointments from approximately 10,000 to 120,000 per week between February and
May of 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, the pandemic has increased
the share of Americans participating in telehealth from 11% in 2019 to 46%
today, with healthcare systems reporting a 50 to 175-fold increase in
telehealth volume compared to pre-pandemic levels.

Tele-Critical Care Program

As part
of an overall telehealth
program
, eICU enables a co-located team of specially trained critical
care physicians and nurses to remotely monitor patients in the ICU regardless
of patient location. With VA managing 1,800 ICU beds nationwide, eICU not only
gives patients access to specialists, but also helps them deliver on the
Quadruple Aim: optimizing care costs, enhancing clinician and patient
satisfaction and improving outcomes. Research has shown that patients in eICU
settings spend less time in the ICU and have better outcomes. Moreover,
family members can talk to clinicians via integrated audio and video technology
to support decision making.

“VA’s
relationship with Philips will help to expand
and improve our tele-critical care program,” said Robert Wilkie, U.S.
Secretary of Veterans Affairs. “This is particularly critical to provide
Veterans access to quality health care when and where they need it
and for improving their health outcomes.”

To
date, more than 20% of U.S. adult ICU beds and 1 in 8 adult ICU patients are
monitored by a 24/7 continuous demand model powered by Philips’ eICU Program,
which combines A/V technology, predictive analytics, data visualization and
advanced reporting capabilities [3, 4]. The core of these proven solutions
is Philips eCareManager software, which uses
advanced analytics and AI to synthesize patient data and deliver actionable
insights to support proactive care in coordination with onsite staff.

Today, Philips continues to work closely with the DoD, VA and
academic partners to drive innovations that can better
support care for troops, as well as telehealth technologies that
can bring care closer to home for our nation’s veterans.

“Philips is committed to improving the lives of 3 billion
people a year by 2030 and is working closely with VA to support one of our most
important initiatives: improving the health of our service men and women,” said
Vitor Rocha, Chief Market Leader for Philips North
America. “By connecting advanced telehealth technologies, clinical data, as
well as clinicians, patients and their families, Philips can
help VA make virtual care a reality and deliver quality health care for one of
our most deserving communities: our nation’s veterans.”