Demographics

Policy Considerations as Children Ages 5-11 Become Eligible for the COVID-19 Vaccine

A new KFF issue brief lays out key factors for the successful rollout of COVID-19 vaccinations for younger children, ages 5 to 11. This week, the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) advisory committee will meet to vote on a request to authorize the Pfizer vaccine for younger children. A final FDA decision, and Centers for…More

Vaccine Monitor: Some Who Were Hesitant to Get a Vaccine in January Say They Changed Their Mind Because of Family, Friends and Their Personal Doctors

A new KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor report finds that people who were initially hesitant to get a vaccine in January but ultimately did so often say that family, friends and their personal doctors helped change their minds. The report features a second round of interviews with a nationally representative sample of adults six months after…More

Women’s Health Care Utilization and Costs: Findings from the 2020 KFF Women’s Health Survey

This brief presents findings from the 2020 KFF Women’s Health Survey on women’s use of health care services, costs, and experiences accessing health care. The 2020 survey is a nationally representative survey of 3,661 women ages 18 to 64, conducted between November 19 and December 17, 2020.

KFF/Post Survey Reveals the Serious Mental Health Challenges Facing Frontline Health Care Workers a Year into the COVID-19 Pandemic

About 1 in 6 Tested Positive for COVID-19, though Few Experienced Major Symptoms; Those Working in Nursing Homes or Assisted Living Facilities Most Likely to Report Testing Positive More than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, a majority of frontline health care workers say the crisis is taking a toll on their mental health, including…More

KFF/The Washington Post Frontline Health Care Workers Survey

This partnership survey with The Washington Post examines the experiences and attitudes of frontline health care workers during the coronavirus pandemic. The spread of COVID-19 throughout the country overwhelmed many health care settings with intensive care units at capacity and other facilities struggling to keep both patients and employees safe. With three COVID-19 vaccines currently …

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Vaccine Monitor: 6 in 10 Adults Have Either Gotten a COVID-19 Vaccine or Want To “as Soon as Possible;” “Wait and See” Group Continues To Shrink

Among Those Who Have Not Been Vaccinated, 3 in 10 Are Unsure if They are Eligible Yet; Hispanic Adults and People with Low Incomes More Likely to Be Unsure The latest KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor report finds enthusiasm for getting a COVID-19 vaccine continuing to grow, with roughly 6 in 10 adults (61%) now saying…More

KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor: March 2021

This Vaccine Monitor finds a growing share of U.S. adults say they have already gotten at least one dose of the vaccine or want to get vaccinated as soon as possible. It explores vaccine intentions, information gaps, vaccine brand preferences, and tests a variety of potential incentives, messages, and pieces of information that might be …

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KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor: Attitudes Towards COVID-19 Vaccination Among Black Women and Men

The latest from the KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor finds that Black men (45%) and women (41%) are more likely than other groups to want to “wait and see” how the COVID-19 vaccine works for others before getting it themselves, making them a key target for public health officials seeking to boost vaccination rates equitably. This…More

KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor: What Do We Know About Those Who Want to “Wait and See” Before Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine?

This brief examines how people to “wait and see” how the COVID-19 vaccine is working for other people before getting vaccinated themselves with different partisan identities and those belonging to different racial and ethnic groups differ in their levels of concern about the vaccine and may respond differently to messages and information.

Public Perspectives on Women’s Health Policy Priorities for the Biden-Harris Administration and Congress

The KFF Women’s Health Survey asked respondents how much of a priority seven key women’s health policies should be for the new President and Congress. This issue brief examines attitudes toward those policy priorities and differences by gender, political party affiliation, and demographic factors.

Most Hispanic Adults Lean Towards Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine, But Many Younger Adults are Hesitant

A new analysis of KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor survey data finds that most Hispanic adults across the country want to get a COVID-19 vaccine at some point though younger adults are more hesitant, in part because of lower confidence that it is safe and effective. Overall a quarter (26%) of Hispanic adults say they will…More

KFF Launches New COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor to Track the Public’s Confidence in the Vaccine and Experiences for the Duration of the Pandemic

Republicans and Black Americans are More Likely to Be Hesitant but Even Among These Groups Reasons Vary KFF has launched a new COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor to dive deeply into the public’s views about the vaccine and experiences getting it for as long as the pandemic lasts. First results released today show that Americans’ enthusiasm for…More

KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor: December 2020

This initial survey for the KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor tracks the public’s attitudes and experiences with COVID-19 vaccinations, with a focus on sub-groups of Americans. It explores confidence in vaccines, assesses trust in messengers, and highlights key challenges for vaccination efforts.

Election 2020: State Health Care Snapshots

Health care is a top issue for voters in the 2020 election. To understand the health care landscape in which the 2020 election policy debates will unfold, these state health care snapshots provide data across a variety of health policy subjects, including health care costs, health coverage—Medicaid, Medicare, private insurance—and the uninsured, women’s health, health …

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By Nearly a 2-1 Margin, Parents Prefer to Wait to Open Schools to Minimize COVID Risk, with Parents of Color Especially Worried Either Way

Most Say Things Will Get Worse Before They Get Better, and Just Over Half Now Say Their Mental Health is Worse Because of Coronavirus Worry and Stress As state and local officials prepare for the new school year amid the COVID-19 pandemic, parents with children who normally attend school overwhelmingly prefer that schools wait to…More