Behind The Byline: How Do You Say …?

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Journalists and producers from across KHN’s newsrooms take you behind the scenes in these bite-size videos to show the ways they are following the story, connecting with sources and sorting through facts.

Victoria Knight — How Do You Say …?

When KHN correspondent Victoria Knight began reporting on the coronavirus risk migrant workers brave to harvest crops, she struggled to find farmworkers willing to speak on record. Many of the workers who are undocumented worry about possible detention by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or fear the Trump administration’s “public charge rule.” The rule allows immigration officers to deny someone admission to the country based on the entry seeker’s lack of economic resources.

Still, she persisted until ― through the Virginia Farm Workers Program at the Central Virginia Legal Aid Society ― she found Saul, 52, a temporary farmworker who has traveled from Mexico to Virginia every year since 1996 to harvest tobacco. Saul’s native language is Spanish, Knight’s is English, but with the help of WhatsApp messenger and translation support from her roommate, she was able to get this story made.

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation which is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

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Behind the Byline: The Count — And the Toll

 

Although the coronavirus pandemic shut down many organizations and businesses across the nation, KHN has never been busier ― and health coverage has never been more vital. We’ve revamped our Behind the Byline YouTube series and brought it to Instagram TV.

Journalists and producers from across KHN’s newsrooms take you behind the scenes in these bite-size videos to show the ways they are following the story, connecting with sources and sorting through facts — all while staying safe.

Lydia Zuraw: The Count — and the Toll

The Guardian and KHN are documenting the lives of U.S. health care workers who have died of COVID-19 complications after being exposed to the coronavirus on the job. Profiles from the Lost on the Frontline project are updated twice a week. So, for months, California Healthline producer Lydia Zuraw has spent endless hours preparing photos, managing text and gathering assets to make sure the posts look great for publication. As the countless faces pass her desk, the death toll is sometimes “emotionally draining,” Zuraw said. But the work has also been a reminder that each person had a family, hobbies and people who loved them, she said.

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation which is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

USE OUR CONTENT

This story can be republished for free (details).

Behind The Byline: ‘Reporting From a Distance’

Although the coronavirus pandemic shut down many organizations and businesses across the nation, KHN has never been busier — and health coverage has never been more vital. We’ve revamped our Behind The Byline YouTube series and brought it to Instagram TV.

Journalists and producers from across KHN’s newsrooms take you behind the scenes in these bite-size videos to show the ways they are following the story, connecting with sources and sorting through facts — all while staying safe.

Anna Almendrala — Reporting From a Distance

KHN reporters have had to change the way they interact with the people during in-person interviews — in order to keep themselves and others safe. Los Angeles correspondent Anna Almendrala takes us with her as she speaks with street vendors across the Los Angeles area. Sometimes the protective layers she wears create, well, social distance: “I’m shocked that people have agreed to talk to me when I’m looking like this,” Almendrala said. An interview with one face mask seller probably would have ended with a hug if it weren’t for COVID-19, she said.